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Full text of "Ranger"

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THE 



RANGER 



FOR 



1961 



F 



OREWORD 



This is the story of a college, 

A Jesuit college, 

Regis College of Denver. 

It relates the milestones 

That pave the road to the future, 

The trivia 

That live with a momentousness 

Peculiar to a personal memory. 

All stories must begin and they must end. 

The beginning of this story 

Is September, 1960. 

The end? 

This story doesn't end 

But will continue to unravel 

Into the very eternity of God, 

For this is the story not 

Of an institution 

But of a way of life. 

James Lindeman, Edwin Feulner, 
Thomas Yax, George Miller, 
Dennis Kiefer, Robert Eaton 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 




Student Chapel 

Dedicated to 



St. John Francis Regis 



of the Society of Jesus 



This is a publication 
of the Student Body 
of Regis College, Denver, Colorado 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION P a ge ie 

Dennis Kiefer, Leo Martelon 

CLASSES page 36 

James Lindeman, George Riff 

ORGANIZATIONS page 82 

George Miller, Stephen Smith, Joseph McGowan, Patrick Moor- 
head, Michael Crowley, Patrick Chandler 

ATHLETICS page lie 

Thomas Yax, Jerry Arndorfer, Gerry Potter, Dan Dalpes, Bob 
Kraus, B. McMahon 

ACTIVITIES page 152 

Robert Eaton, James Hartman, Del Ellis, Jim Curtan, Sam Scior- 
tino, Tom Crutcher, Mike Sheahan, Bob O'Donnell, John Stark, 
Dennis Dalpes, Jim Hackett 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Edivin Feulner, Berney Mantey, Ray Schramm, John Hession, 
Jim Casebolt, Burke McDonald, Mike Crowley, Jim Trucker, 
Bob Burnson. Leroy Garcia, Mike McCormick, Tom Koester 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Donald Mildenberger 



jUITIJCj ' 




St. Ignatius Loyola 



Founder of the 
Society of Jesus 




Main Hall 




Carroll Hall 




Student Center 



Main Hall 



Carroll 





O'Connell and Carroll Halls 





Msgr. Jones, Director of Education 





Mons. D'Amour of NCEA 
speaks on education. 



N. Carolina's Holmon speaks 
on southern literature. 





Dr. McGlone convokes 
fall assembly. 











O'Connell Hall 



from south 




from west 




Our Lady's shrine 



10 




Loyola Hall 




Loyola Hall 



11 





O'Connell Hall at night 



Student Center at night 



!:: 



"Religion! et 
Bonis Artibus" 




Carroll Hall at night 




' 









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Fieldhouse 



Alumni Michael 
Farley and 
John Conway 
discuss Regis' 
future 







15 



The Very Reverend 



Richard F. Ryan, S.J. 



President of Regis College 




President's Message 

The year just ending has been a significant one in the history 
of the college. It has not been marked by great physical additions to 
the campus, or sweeping academic or administrative changes, but it 
has produced results which will have a lasting effect. 

This has been a year of study, of reflection, of examination. 
Since early fall we have been engaged in a campus-wide self-study designed 
to give us the most complete self-portrait in our history. 

Committees have been working to compile exhaustive, detailed 
reports on the present status of every phase of our operation, from 
academics to property holdings, and from student services to finance and 
management. 

There were several reasons for such a detailed analysis. The 
most fundamental one was the fact Regis had reached a plateau in its de- 
velopment, and it was time to pause, to take stock, before continuing the 
pattern of growth which has characterized the past decade. 

Since 1956, Regis has invested more than $3 million in new 
buildings and other physical improvements, while similar changes and 
improvements have been made in nearly every other area of the college. 

It was time to make a definitive evaluation of our present posi- 
tion in order to lay the proper foundation for additional long-range planning. 
This has now been accomplished, and the data collected over the past months 
are now being evaluated and measured. 

Once this has been accomplished, we shall be in a strong 
position to project our plans forward into the next decade and beyond. 

The seniors among you have witnessed the recent period 
of dramatic growth, while the freshmen will be part of the exciting 
period which lies ahead. I would like to ask each of you, from first 
year student to graduating senior, to help us with your cooperation, 
your prayers, and your continuing interest as we move to meet our 
obligations of the future. 

Sin<fe)rely , 

// ■ \ry 

Richard F. Ryan, S.J'., 
President . 




17 




Rev. Bernard J. Murray S.J 



18 



Dedication 










Regis is a growing institution. In the past few 
years this has been evidenced in all areas; education, 
athletics, and physical facilities. But there comes a 
moment when Regis must be recognized for what it 
is spiritually. For this is the key to success. Our 
ultimate goal and the fulfillment of our vocation 
here on earth depend upon the guidance of our 
soul. We put our trust in Regis, that through its 
directiveness, we may mature both mentally and 
spiritually. This development requires the effort of 
a wise, understanding, and patient man. It requires 
one who is not only capable of handling his own 
problems, but can offer sound advice for the prob- 
lems of others. 

With pride in his outstanding leadership and un- 
faltering guidance, the staff of this yearbook humbly 
submits the name of one comparable to this task of 
spiritual advisor, the Rev. Bernard J. Murray, S.J. 
Known throughout the Denver area for his relentless 



interest in vocations. Father Murray first began his 
work as a scholastic and coach of baseball, football, 
and basketball here at Regis. His uncanny shrewd- 
ness and moral influence led to brilliant perform- 
ances in baseball. In 1918, he left Regis and began 
his study of theology in St. Louis. Concurrently, 
seven of his Regis boys entered the novitiate at 
Florissant, Missouri — truly his boys, for it was he 
that cultivated their vocations. Upon being ordained 
in June, 1921, Father Murray returned to Regis 
where he has remained except for a brief transfer 
to Creighton University in Omaha. A member of 
the faculty for 33 years, Father Murray now serves 
as chaplain and student counselor. His ability to 
impress upon a student the importance of God 
throughout life, leaves nothing to be desired. Thus, 
we respectfully dedicate the 1961 Ranger to this 
true builder of men. 







19 





111 




111 










' ' : 


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FACULTY 



Commerce 
and 

Finance 







MR. JOHN V. COYNE 

Chairman of the Department 
Professor of Business Administration 




REV. THOMAS F. FINUCANE, S.J. 
Instructor in Accounting 




MR. MYLES J. DOLAN 

Instructor in Accounting 




MR. 


RUDY SPORCICH 


Assistant Professor 


0/ Accounting 




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MR. KENNETH C. SEIDENSTRICKER 
Instructor in Economics 



22 




Humanities 



REV. MATTHEW R. LYNCH, S.J. 
Instructor in Classical Languages 




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REV. RICHARD F. BOCKLAGE, S.J. 

Instructor in English 





REV. ROBERT R. BOYLE, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 
Assistant Professor of English 




MR. FRANCIS MORRISS 

Instructor in English 



REV. JOHN F. LYONS, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of English 



2:; 




MR. LUCIEN O. PICHETTE 
Instructor in Foreign Language 



Physical 
Education 





REV. CHARLES F. KRUGER, S.J. 
Assistant Professor of Speech 



MR. JOSEPH B. HALL 

Chairman of the Department 

Athletic Director 

Instructor in Physical Education 




MR. ARTHUR KALEHER 

Instructor in Physical Education 



24 




REV. ELMER J. TRAME, SJ. 

Professor of Biology 




REV. JOSEPH V. DOWNEY, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Physics 




and 
Mathematics 




REV. FRED T. DALY, S.J. 

Chairman of the Department 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 




REV. GEORGE M. TIPTON, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



MR. ALVIN M. EARLE 

Instructor in Biology 



2') 



Philosophy 
and 

Theology 




REV. HARRY R. KLOCKER, S.J. 

Chairman of the Department 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 




MR. DONALD L. SCHMITZ 
Lecturer in Philosophy 




REV. EDWARD L. MAGINNIS, S.J. 
Instructor in Theology 




REV. CHRISTIAN L. BONNET, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 




REV. FRANCIS J. MALACEK, S.J. 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 



26 




REV. HARRY E. HOEWISCHER, S.J. 
Instructor in Education 





MOST REV. 

BERNARD J. SULLIVAN, S.J. 

Instructor in Theology 



Social 
Science 




REV. WALTER F. HARRIS, S.J. 
Instructor in Theology 



REV. HAROLD L. STANSELL, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 
Associate Professor of History 



27 



AM, \JL M.M3. M. AM. A. 




REV. BERNARD J. KARST, S.J. 
Dean of Men 




MR. EDWARD STOKES 
Director of Evening Division 




REV. HARRY E. HOEWISCHER, S.J. 
Academic Dean 




MR. JOHN V. COYNE 
Assistant to Academic Dean 




REV. THOMAS J. SHEEHEY, S.J. 
Father Minister 



28 




REV. JOHN J. GIBBONS, S.J. 
Registrar 




MR. VINCENT R. BURNS 
Alumni Director 




MR. GENE DONOHUE 
Business Manager 




REV. WILLIAM F. HOUSER, S.J. 
Treasurer 




MR. RICHARD J. CONNOR, JR. 
Director of Public Relations 




MISS EILEEN LATENSER 
Head Librarian 



29 




Executive Board, left to right: Dennis Gallagher, Ken Joule, Bob Pipkin, Paul Horan, Chris O'Donnell, Dan Otero, and Paul Dugan. 



PAUL R. HORAN 
President 




ROBERT D. PIPKIN 
Vice-President 



i !f. 



CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL 
Secretary 





30 



Student 
Administration 



The very recently revamped Student Senate con- 
tinued to insure an effective liaison with the faculty 
for the students. Much of its work, however, went 
toward successfully coordinating the many and 
varied student interests in every phase or cam- 
pus life. 

True to its promises the present administration 
worked long and hard to promote a closer tie in 
academic and cultural interests between Regis and 
the other schools in the area. Inter-collegiate ath- 
letics featuring intramural teams only was innovated. 
Uncle Sam was persuaded to locate a mail box on 
campus. Freshman Week, class elections, awards, 
subsidies all were under the careful direction of 
the Student Senate. 

Every student and every student group looked 
to the Senate for approval and assistance in carry- 
ing out ideas. Alpha Delta Gamma, the Bench- 
warmers and its cheerleaders, the Denver Club, the 
Literary Club plus the other organizations will wit- 
ness to the overall guidance of the Senate. General 
assemblies may have been stormy and rock-ribbed 
in parliamentary procedure but they never failed to 
give adequate representation to every opinion 
current among the students. Its decisions were 
final and accepted as such. 




KENNETH R. JOULE 

Treasurer 




DENNIS P. GALLAGHER 

Student Senate Director 



PAUL V. DUGAN 

Student Senate Director 



DANIEL OTERO 

Student Senate Director 



REV. 

THOMAS F. FINUCANE, S.J. 

Student Senate Moderator 






HI 




CLASSES 



ALENIUS, JOHN T. ALAMADA, RAPHAEL J. BARTEAU, RICHARD 

Denver, Colo. Acapuleo, Mexico Denver, Colo. 

Brown and Gold; I.R. Assoc.; Denver Sodality; St. John Berchmans; Span- Baseball; R Club; Ralian Club. 

Club. ish Club. 



BATT, TOM 
Denver, Colo. 




BOERSIG, GEORGE RICHARD 
Lakeside, Colo. 

Denver Club; Bowling Club; 
Sportman's Club. 



BRENNAN, THOMAS FRANCIS 
St. Louis Park, Minn. 

KREG Radio; Alpha Delta Gamma. 



BUHR, JOSEPH D. 

Raton, N. Mex. 

Dean's List; Joseph G. Ryan Me- 
morial Award; Brown and Gold. 



BOIAN, MICHAEL REAY 
Denver, Colo.. 

Aquinas Club; St. Thomas More 
Club; KREG Radio; IRA. 




BEDDOES, MORRIS G. 
Fullerton, Calif. 



BARTH, THEODORE J. 
Colo. Springs, Colo. 



St. Thomas More; Sociology Club; Sodality; St. John Berchmans; KREG 
Ski Club. Radio; Band; Dean's List. 




BURNS, BRIAN C. 
Lakewood, Colo. 

Sociology Club. 



CLARK, JAMES T. 
Wichita, Kans. 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappa Psi. 




BELFORD, WILLIAM A. 
Beggs, Okla. 

Aquinas Club; Brown and Gold; 
KREG Radio; Rho Chi Sigma; 
IRA; Benchwarmers. 




BLATTER, FRANK E. 
Denver, Colo. 

R Club; Basketball; Baseball; 
Dean's List. 



BLACKFORD, LAWRENCE C. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Denver Club; Playhouse; Bench- 
warmers. 



BOERSIG, MAURICE J. 
Lakewood, Colo. 

Denver Club. 



CLINTON, LAWRENCE E. 
Denver, Colo. 

Sodality; Literary Club; IRA; 
Playhouse; SNEA. 




CONNLEY, ROBERT J. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Aquinas Club; St. 
Thomas More Club; Denver 
Club. 



DUGAN, PAUL V. 
Wichita, Kan. 

Director Student Senate; Hall Prefect. 



DURSEY, ANTHONY M. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Fr. Ryan Accounting 
Award. 






■-■■*!-. 









DIETZ, ROBERT R. 
Wauwatosa, Wise. 

Sodality; St. John Berchmans; 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 




DISTEL, RONALD A. 
Silverton, Colo. 

Rho Chi Sigma. 



GALLAGHER, DENNIS P. 
Denver, Colo. 

Director Student Senate; Sodality; 
Literary Club; IRA; Denver Club; 
Playhouse. 



GODFREY, JAMES P. 
Tulsa, Okla. 

St. John Berchmans; St. Thomas 
More Club; Brown and Gold; Ranger; 
KREG; Alpha Kappa Psi. 







GOTTSCHALK, JAMES C. 
Garden City, Kan. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



GRAND, CHARLES A. 
Denver, Colo. 
Denver Club. 



GRANT, ARTHUR W. 
Boulder, Colo. 



Sodality; 
Society. 



St. John Berchmans; Debate 



HALEY, MICHAEL J. 
Denver. Colo. 

Brown and Gold; Denser Club; NLA: 
History Club. 



37 




HERRERA, EDWARD 
Denver, Colo. 



HIBBISON, CRAIG A. 
Short Hills, N. J. 

Thomas More Club; KREG; R. Club 
Tennis; I.R.A.; Denver Club. 



HITZELBERGER, THOMAS 
Chicago, 111. 

Dean's List; Varsity Basketball; R 
Club; I.R.A.; Golf; KREG; Brown 
and Gold; RANGER. 



HORAN, R. PAUL 

Denver, Colo. 

Aquinas Club; I.R.A.; KREG; Brown 
and Gold; St. Thomas More; Debate 
Society. 







HOUSTON, WILLIAM B. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 

Aquinas Club; St. Thomas More Club; 
Italian Club; Ski Club. 



JOHNSON, CLYDE D. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



JOULE, KENNETH R. 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Dean's List; Regis Man of the Year, 
I960; Freshman Scholastic Award; 
Treasurer, Student Senate; Sophomore 
Class President; Editor, Brown and 
Gold; Who's Who; Sodality. 



KING, RAYMOND G. 
Laramie, Wyo. 

St. John Berchmans; Brown and 
Gold; IRA. 



38 



KOSMICKI, PATRICK 

Alliance, Nebr. 



KOSEDNAR, JOHN H. 
West Allis, Wis. 



Aquinas Club; Dean's List; Brown St. John Berchmans; Brown and Gold; 
and Gold. Alpha Kappa Psi; Bowling; Hall 

Prefect. 




LENNON, ROBERT A. 

Sioux City, Iowa 



LINNEBUR, THOMAS L 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



Broivn and Gold; Alpha Kappa Psi; Alpha Kappa Psi; Sodality. 
Ski Club; Baseball. 




KOSEDNAR, LOUIS J. 
West Allis, Wis. 

St. John Berchmans; Ski Club; 
Basketball; Tennis. 



LANDAUER, THOMAS C. 
Denver, Colo. 
Dean's List. 



LaNOUE, TERRY K. 
Denver, Colo. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



LEARNED, MICHAEL J. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Denver Club. 





s& 







LONG, JERRY 
Denver, Colo. 

Denver Club; Italian Club. 



LUCHETTA, GEORGE 
Denver, Colo. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



LYONS, JOHN E. 
Calais, Maine 

SNEA. 



MARCHINO, JOHN G. 
Price, Utah 

Dean's List. 




MARRIN, LAWRENCE W. 
Dalton, Nebr. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



MAYER, MICHAEL 
Kansas City, Mo. 

St. John Berchman; Literary Club; 
Brown and Gold; KREG Radio; Alpha 
Delta Gamma; R Club; Ski Club; 
Basketball; Baseball; Intra-club 
Council. 




McCOY, JOHN 

Milwaukee, V/is. 

Conclave Rep.; Brown and Gold; 
KREG Radio; Alpha Delta Gamma; R 
Club; Ski Club; Baseball. 



McCULLOUGH, MIKE 
Denver, Colo. 

IRA; Denver Club. 



Mclaughlin, peter 

Denver, Colo. 



MURNAN, W. THOMAS 
Denver, Colo. 



St. John Berchmans; Aquinas Club; Dean's List. 
Literary Club; Debate Society; St. 
Thomas More Club; Sociology Club; 
Brown and Gold; KREG Radio; R 
Club - Tennis; IRA - Baseball; Den- 
ver Club. 



O'MEARA, OWEN PATRICK 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Aquinas Club; Rho 
Chi Sigma; Denver Club. 




NORTON, DENNIS 
Denver, Colo. 

Sociology Club. 



O'DONNELL, CHRISTOPHER "" 
Detroit, Mich. 

Dean's List; Senate Secretary; Who's 
Who; KREG; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Brown and Gold; Ranger; Vice Pres. 
Sophomore and junior Class; Hall 
Prefect; Ski Club. 



O'NEAL, PETER J. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

St. John Berchmans; Debate So- 
ciety; Brown and Gold; Ranger 
Yearbook; Alpha Kappa Psi; IRA; 
Ski Club; Basketball; Bench- 
warmers. 




O'NEILL, PATRICK H. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

St. John Berchmans; St. Thomas 
More Club; Sociology Club; 
Brown and Gold; Ranger Year- 
book; Alpha Delta Gamma; Ski 
Club. 





OTERO, DANIEL u 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Who's Who; Student Senate Di- 
rector; Junior Class SSA; Hall 
Prefect; Brown and Gold; KREG 
Radio; Rho Chi Sigma; Bench- 
warmers. 





PAULBECK, THEDORE M. 
Elm Grove, Wise. 

Sodality; KREG; Dean's List; 

NEA. 




%i 



1 



PIPKIN, ROBERT D. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Freshman Scholas- 
tic Award; Sophomore Scholastic 
Award; Forestall Award; Vice 
President Student Senate; Aqui- 
nas Club; Rho Chi Sigma; Den- 
ver Club; Man of the Year 
Award 1960. 



REINECKE, MARK E. 
Aurora, Colo. 

KREG; Rho Chi Sigma; Denver Club; 
Playhouse. 



ROBLEE, MICHAEL J. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 

Sodality; Brown and Gold; Ranger; 
KREG; IRA. 



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QUINN, WILLIAM J. 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Sodality; IRA; Alpha Kappa Psi. 




*# 



RAUEN, JAMES L. 
Kenosha, Wise. 

St. John Berchmans; 
Sigma; Playhouse. 



ROITZ, CHARLES J. 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Rho Chi Sodality; IRA; Dean's List. 



ROMERO, CHARLES J. 
Denver, Colo. 

Playhouse; Baseball. 



RYAN, JOSEPH G. 
Denver, Colo. 



SCHNEIDER, THOMAS F. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 



SCHWARTZ, RALPH A. 
Hartington, Neb. 



Dean's List; Vice President Fresh- Hall Prefect; Brown and Gold; 
man Class; St. Thomas More Club; KREG; Alpha Delta Gamma. 
Alpha Kappa Psi; IRA; Denver Club. 



SCAGLIA, THOMAS N. 
Denver, Colo. 

Aquinas Club; Literary Club; St. 
Thomas More Club; Brown and Gold; 
KREG; IRA; Denver Club; Italian 
Club; Playhouse. 




STARBUCK, DENNIS E. 
Brighton, Colo. 

Dean's List; KREG; Denver Club. Dean's List 



STEIN, JAMES B. 
Minneapolis, Kan. 



STEWART, THOMAS B. 
Taipei, Taiwan 

St. Thomas More Club; KREG. 



SYNOGROUND, CLIFF C. 
Richland, Wash. 



•-< 








TERABINO, JOSEPH A. 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Aquinas Club; Literary Club; 
Brown and Gold; KREG; Ski 
Club. 



TRACY, THOMAS JOSEPH 
Crosse Pointe, Mich. 

Sodality; Brown and Gold; Ranger; 
KREG; Alpha Kappa Pi; IRA; Play- 
house; Ski Club; Sportsman Club. 



WATERS, JAMES J. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Who's Who; Dean's List; Junior Class 
Treasurer; St. John Berchman; Aqui- 
nas Club; Brown and Gold Editor; 
KREG; Rho Chi Sigma; Ski Club; 
Tennis. 




TAYLOR, JAMES BRADY 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dean's List; National Office 
Management Association Scholar- 
ship; Who's Who; Secretary- 
Junior Class; Sodality; Brown 
and Gold; Ranger; KREG; Alpha 
Delta Gamma; IRA; Ski Club; 
Benchwarmers. 







y 




THEISEN, GERALD B. 
Sugar Grove, 111. 

R Club; Basketball; Baseball. 



44 



WETHINGTON, WILLIAM J. 
Denver, Colo. 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Dean's List. 



WELLS, MICHAEL 

Fairview, N. Mex. 

SSA Junior Class; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Playhouse; Dean's List. 



WILLIAMS, A. KENTON 
Charleston, W. Va. 

Sociology Club; R Club; Basket- 
ball; Baseball. 




VESCOVO, ROBERT EMMETT 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Sodality; Brown and Gold; 
Ranger; KREG; Italian Club; 
Golf; Benchwarmers. 



YAX, JAMES FRANCIS 
Lincoln, Nebr. 

Dean's List; Theology Award; 
Aquinas Club; Debate Society; 
Rho Chi Sigma. 









Del Ellis, Bob Eaton, John Collins, Fred Albi, Dave Cullan. 



Class of 1962 



46 




ABLE, T. J. 




ALBI, F. A. 




AVILA, J. B. 



m**. 



J? 




BARBICK, M. H. 
BENNETT, J. D. 



BATT, T. H. 
BERG, J. W. 



fW^ 




BEAUVIS, P. J. 
BISENIUS, M. D. 



BOCKLAGE, V. P. 
BRISNEHAN..J. L. 



BROWN, C. F. 
BUCKLEY, W. P. 



BUDINGER, C. J. 
BURKE, J. K. 





w -^ 



■ 

1 



HOOGERWORE, K. L. HUPPERT, D. L. 



ISLER, H. J. 
RAEFE, W. S. 



GREITEN, W. E. 
HAMMOND, J. M. 



HARTMANN, J. E. 
HENRY, J. W. 



IUPPERT, L. W. IMMORDINO, J. J 




KELLY, T. E. 
KELLY, W. H 



KENT, D. H. 
KUDAR, M. S. 





McDANIEL, D. M. 

Mcdonald, n. m. 



McMAHON, J. C. 
METZ, J. T. ' 



MOSCHEL, R. W. 
MULLANEY, R. P. 



MURA, J. A. 
O'KEEFE, R. K. 



NAU, L. J. 
CLEAR, B. T. 



O'CONNELL, J. R. 
PATTERSON, L. E. 





' 




RAMONA, C. A. 




REICHERT, F. F. 



REID, G. E. 






RICKEN, D. J. 
SCHMITT, C. L. 




RYAN, P. M. 
SCIORTINO, S. C. 




RYAN, T. P. 
SHERMAN, J. F. 



SIMMS, R. E. 
STARK, J. M. 



SULLIVAN, D. A. 
TAYLOR, L. R. 



THILL, R. J. 
THORSEN, J. D. 



WAMSER, C. J. 
WADE, C. G. 





Buzz Eby, Ed Feulner, Joe Fanganelio, Dan Dalpes, Mike Doyle. 



Class of 1963 






^£^1 




AMMAN, M. W. 



ARNDORFER, G. F. 



ARMIJO, J. F. 





ARCHER, R. P. 
BARNICLE, R. T. 



ARCHIBECK, P. J. 
BARTZ, D. D. 



ARCHULEAT, J. E. 
BEATTY, T. J. 



BOWLES, R. L. 
BEIRICH, L. E. 



B1NTNER, L. W. 
BRETZ, J. E. 



BRIGGS, J. T. 
BRUNO, D. D. 




BORER, P. F 



CAMPION, T. M 



COUGHLIN, E. B 




COSTIGAN, M. W. 



CURTAN, J. C. 



CLARK, R. J. 
COFFEY, D. E. 



COFFEY, D. J. 
COLLINS, R. E. 



CONNOR, R. T. 
CARELLI, M. V. 



DESMOINEAUR, C. J. 
DEMPSEY, J. R. 



DEVEREAUX, D. R. 
DIEHL, D. C. 



DOHERTY, J. J. 
DOWD, D. C. 



DALPES, D. M. 



DALPES, D. J. 



DOOHER, G. R. 








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DOYLE, M. P. 




DWYER, F. X. 




E1CHINGER, T. R. 







FEELY, R. C. 
FEULNER, E. J. 



FINNERTY, A. L. 
FISHER, J. E. 



GALLAGHER, E. G. 
GALLIPEAU, E. L. 



EDWARDS, M. J. 
EWERS, M. H. 



EICKER, P. J. 
FANGANILLO, J. M. 



ENGEL, R. J. 
FARLEY, P. D. 




GARDNIER, J. A 



GESSLER, D. J 



GOETTLER, J. A 




GRABR1AN, V. M. GREITEN, J. E 




HAKES, J. M. 
HANNEGAN, D. 



HAFFEY, M. D. HERZOG, J. F. 

HEINDENREICH, R. D. HESSION, J. R. 



HORMEL, H. P. HOPKINS, T. A. 

HUPP, V. J. IMM, R. F. 



HREN, S. E. 
JAMES, D. D. 



JENNINGS, R. K. JOHNSON, G. F. JOHNSON, S. W. 






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KRUSE, G. A. 



JONES, J. R. 
KAMMER, D. J. 



KIEFER, D. L. 
KIMBALL, R. J. 



KIMSEY, T. P. 
KITTO, D. E. 



MALONEY, J. E. 
MASSEY, K. J. 



McCarthy, s. j. 

McGUIRE, M. W. 



McNAMARA, J. S. 
MILDENBERGER, D. 



LAVVLER, D. J. LOWRY, J. VV 





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PEDDECORD, M. T. 



PEDOTTO, J. J. 



P1PPINGER, J. R. 



MORRISROE, J. P. 
MORGAN, R. B. 



MULHOLLAND, R. 
MURPHY, J. M. 



O'CONNER, J. R. 
OCONNER, J. J. 



RIFF, G. K. 
RIVARD, D. R. 



ROHAN, P. C. 
ROSS, M. J. 



POTTER, G. T. 



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SCHREIVOGEL, H. O. 



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STRAW, R. L. 
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SULLIVAN, D. L. 

SUMMERS, S. N. 



SUSSMAN, D. R. 
SWANSAN, C. L. 



SCHMIT, J. L. 
SCHOENEBECK, R. L. 



SCHMITZ, P. A. 
STOUT, L. 



SCHMITZ, W. M. 
SPINUZZI, R. 




VALDEZ, D. L 



WALGREEN, J. A 




WALSH, J. P. 



WARNER, J. W. 



WINKS, W. R. 




WRIGHT, T. F. 
WOOD, J. P. 



YAX, T. J. 
YEZZI, C. D. 



60 




Sheahan, Jim Springer, Lorr Quinn, Doug Cullan, leo Martelon. 



Class of 1964 



61 




ADAMSON, R. J. 



BARBO, M. J. 
BANNON, F. M. 
BARE, B. T. 




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BELLAMY, N. J. 




AUSTIN, G. F. 



BELMONT, R. C. 





BABCOCK, R. E. 
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BERBERICK, H. 





BLECHA, W. F. 



BERBICK, R. L. 
BLACKFORD, R. E. 



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BROWN, D. M. 
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BROWN, P. C. BROWN, W. M. 

BUTTERFIELD, D. E. CALLIS, D. M. 



BRUCKNER, J. W. 
CANNY, J. G. 



CAPILUPPO, V. 
CHANDLER, J. G. 



CAREY, D. W. 
COMSTOCK, M. D. 



CASEBOLT, J. R. 
CONRADS, t. J. 



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CONRADS, T. P. CONVERY, W. J. CRAWFORD, G. P. CLARK, M. V. COPPS, T. 



CROKE, T. 
CROKIN, J. P. 





DAKLKE, L. 



CROWLEY, M. T. CRUTCHER, W. T. CULLAN, C. 



DAVIS, B. F. 
DeCOOK, J. L. 



CURRAN, M. D. CZERNIAK, L. W. 






DRISCOLL, P. T. 
DOLEZAL, J. R. 
DONNELLY, M. R. 



DIXON, M. 
DRISCOLL, D. D. 



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DWYER, J. 
DVORACEK, J. 




DUNNE, D. J. 




EARLY, M. 




EICHMAN, W. 




FENNESSY, P. V. 




FITZGERALD, M. T. 



FOLEY, M. 
FOREST, R. 
FRANCIS, J. 



FITZPATRICK, M. R 



FICCO, A. 





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FRISCHKORN, R. S. GALBNEY, G. R. 
GEILA, M. J. GERBER, R. J. 



GALLIGAN, J. E. 
GIBSON, F. W. 



GIROUX, J. E. 
HANLEY, R. J. 



GUIDA, R. D. 
HARBICK, B. J. 



HALE, V. J. 
HANEBRINK, W. E. 



68 




KUNTZ, W. J. 
LAMMERMAN, F. M. 
KACZYNSKI, F. S. LANE, J. O. 



KENSTRA, T. A. 




KOJIS, T. A. 
KRUSE, W. J. 




LESTER, M 



LIEBMANN, H. C. 





LINEHAN, T. 
LITTLE, M. J. 




LOCHNER, M. 




LOPEZ, S. R. 



LUBECK, A. J. 



LUBINSKI, T. V. 



LUNA, C. J. 



MARKEL, G. 
MARADEL, D. R. 
MALAVER, F. 



MacDONALD, W. B 



MacPHERSON, J. 





MANTEY, B. D. 
MAXWELL, T. D. 



mattson, e. j. 
McCartney, r. w. 



MATSON, G. C. 
McCORMACK, R. M. 



McEAHERN, K. M. 
McKEXNA, J. V. 



McELROY, C. P. McEVOY, C. 

Mclaughlin, m. r. McNalley, j. d. 



72 






McNEALY, K 




MURPHY, R. J. 



NEOMPEY, R. O. 
O'DWYER, G. J. 



MORATTA, M. J. MOORHEAD, P. H. RUDLOFF, L. D. 







PIETIG, J. 
QUINN, L. W. 
O'KEEFE, J. P. RAMSEY, R. S. 




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SARDELLO, R. J. 



SOUBA, L. W. 



SAUER, G. A. 




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SCHAEFFER, R. J 



SCHERR, M. J. 



SAVAGE, T. W. 



SHAVER, P. E. 
SELENKE, W. 
SCHULTE, M. G. 





SHEEHAN, M. F. 
SNOW, A. 



SKULAVIK, S. 
SOWDEN, D. L. 



SMITH, D. W. 
SPANIER, T. J. 



SPRINGER, J. P. 
STEVENS, K. C. 



STAUFFER, D. C. 
STEWART, R. M. 



STEFFES, R. 
STONE, D. B. 



76 





STOVER, T. C 



SULLIVAN, M. L. 
SUTHERLAND, C. W. 



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SUTHERLAND, J. 



TRAINER, J. D. 



TRECKER, J. H. 




WALSH, S. 
WALTERS, W. R. 
WANSER, J. E. 




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WALLNER, J. S. 
WALSH, R. L. 



WATERS, D. 



WHALEN, W. H. 



WHALEY, M. L. 



WEBER, J. C. 



WEGS, T. J. 





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WILCOXEN, G. W. 



WILSON, G. W. 



WEINGARDT, K. V. 
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ZWEIFEL, D. D. 




GILG, R. F. 




WILSON, R. D. 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




SODALITY OF THE B.V.M. 




FRONT ROW: Roger Milbert, Charles Sutherland, Bruce Sommers, Ron Moschel, Dennis Gallagher, Jerry King, Ed Feulner. SECOND ROW: Chuck Budinger, 
Gil Rael, Jack Redmond, Mike Roblee, Jim Hartman, Bill Quinn. THIRD ROW: Bert Liebman, Jerry Boyle, Joe Weber. Sam Sciortino, Steve Mohroisky. 



OFFICERS: Bill Quinn, Roger Milbert, Rev. T. Casey, Jerry King, Prefect, Ron 
Moschel 




The Regis College Sodality is a small organiza- 
tion with big accomplishments. It is a Way of Life 
leading its members and all who come into contact 
with its members to Christian perfection and the 
defense of the Church. 

The activities of the Sodality include weekly 
trips to the State Reformatory in Golden, Colorado 
to teach catechism to the boys there and to prepare 
them for Holy Communion and Confirmation. The 
Socialists visit with the people at St. Elizabeth's 
Home for the Aged and help keep the buildings 
and grounds appearing nicely. There are also trips 
every week to four different parishes to teach cate- 
chism to children who do not go to Catholic schools. 
A Halloween party for 150 orphans, a Christmas 
party for the boys at the Industrial Home, and a 
school wide clothing drive for the St. Vincent de 
Paul Society are annual affairs of the Sodality. From 
the Sunday collections the expenses of the Apostolic 
Committee's activities are paid and the remaining 
directed to the foreign missions. 

The high point of the year's activities is the 
closed retreat for Sodalists and seniors at the Jesuit 
retreat house in Sedalia, Colorado. 



MEN OF MARY 



82 



SKI CLUB 




FIRST ROW: Grant Wade, John Murphy, Tony Finnerty, Dennis Lawler, Mike Ross, Jerry Lowry, Dave Yeni, Ron Babcock. SECOND ROW: Pete O'Neal, Pat 
Quint, Tim Eichinger, Ed Coughlin, Jim Taylor, Pat Ryan, Mike Mayer, Pat Kosmicki. THIRD ROW: Bert Liebman, Mike Bannon, Jack Wallner, Morrill Murphy, 
Tom Switzer, Kevin O'Keefe, Mike Doyle, Dan Devereaux, Carl Sullivan. 



OFFICERS: Tim Campion, Bob O'Donnell, Pres., John Stark, Chris O'Donnell 




Boasting about one hundred members, the Ski 
Club continues to promote and coordinate Regis ski 
activity. Open to all earnest skiers, as well as 
novices, the club fosters the fastest growing sport 
on campus. Since Colorado is blessed with some of 
the finest ski areas in the country, these enthusiasts 
have no trouble in planning their bi-monthly trips. 
During the year, the club obtained rides for its mem- 
bers to such ski areas as Berthould and Loveland 
passes and Arapahoe Basin. 

On each trip, the experienced members of the 
club give part of their time for the instruction of 
the beginners. Aside from the regularly planned 
trips, the club also sponsored an intra-mural ski meet, 
showed movies on skiing and had a fashion show in 
ski apparel. In addition to these activities, several 
trips were planned in conjunction with the Loretto 
Heights Ski Club which culminated with an 
end-of-season meet. 

Under the guidance of Bob O'Donnell, president; 
Tim Campion, vice-president; John Stark, treasurer; 
and Chris O'Donnell, secretary, the Ski Club has 
provided these snow bunnies with the means of par- 
ticipating in the most popular outdoor sport at Regis. 



MEN MID ICE AND SNOW 



83 



DEBATE SOCIETY 




FIRST ROW: Joe Cunningham, Wi'liam Selenke, Robert Scarselli, Joseph Pettit, Pat Moorhead Joe Murphey. SECOND ROW: Fr. Charles Kruger, Steve Leo- 
nard, Bert Liebman, Michael Sheahan, William Convery, Charles Sutherland, Michael Thomas. THIRD ROW: Donald Rivard, Joe Weber, Stephen Thalin, Tom 
Scaglia, Paul Horan, Paul Fairchild, Mike Clark. 



OFFICERS: Mike Clark, Paul Fairchild, Tom Scaglia, Pres ., Fr. Kruger, Joe 
Pettit, Robert Scarselli 




Through the activities of the Debate Society, 
members learn to think on their feet, express them- 
selves clearly, and meet the stimulating challenges 
of other minds. 

During the past year, the Debate Society en- 
countered groups from other schools throughout the 
region, and, over the Thanksgiving holidays of 1960, 
they met with some of the best debate teams in the 
country in Chicago. At the Chicago debate, spon- 
sored by Loyola University, Joseph Pettit and Paul 
Fairchild teamed up to walk off with four awards 
for Regis College, while the other team of Paul 
Horan and John Bruggemen also won once. 

Father Carl Kruger, S. J., Regis debate coach, 
was invited to West Point to act as a judge for de- 
bates at the Military Academy because of his 
interest and knowledge of forensic principles. This 
interest and knowledge is something that Fr. Kruger 
has succeeded in inculcating into the members of the 
debate society under his tutelage. 



MEN OF THE MIGHTY WORD 



84 



ST. THOMAS MORE SOCIETY 




FIRST ROW: Mr. Dolan, Moderator, Ron Barbich, Ron Kimball, Bob Frischkorn, Paul Harrer, Jerry Pierce. SECOND ROW: Frank Jackson, Tom Scaglia, John 
Pippinger, Dan McNally, Bob Cook. THIRD ROW: Bill Struck, Don Rivard, Mike Amman, Mike Barbich, Jim Fisher, Tom Garlien. 



OFFICERS: Mr. Dolan, Bob Cook, Mike Barbich, Tom Scaglia 




St. Thomas More was an Englishman who became 
the Prime Minister of England during the reign of 
Henry VIII. A man well versed in law, he appropri- 
ately stands as the patron of lawyers and law socie- 
ties. The budding lawyers of Regis' campus rightly 
have organized under his aegis. 

The St. Thomas More Club exists primarily to 
help advance pre-legal students in a more specific 
knowledge of law and law schools. It gathers to- 
gether and makes available information about the 
profession itself and the requirements of the law 
schools throughout the country. With this in mind, 
practicing lawyers and judges on the bench ad- 
dressed the Club throughout the year. At various 
times, too, the Club observed actual courtroom 
procedure, usually at the invitation of the judge. In 
keeping with the long-standing tradition of the legal 
society, the St. Thomas More Club sponsors its 
own Red Mass. 



COURT PLEADERS 



85 



ST. JOHN BERCHMANS SOCIETY 




FIRST ROW: Jim Casebolt, Charles Sutherland, John Mura, Joe Fanganello, Don Mildenberger, Jerry King. SECOND ROW: John Thorsen, Dennis Dalpes, 
Jack Redmond, Charles McEvoy, Burke MacDonald, Chuck Budinger, George McLaughlin. THIRD ROW: William Graefe, Jerry Boyle, Rich Thill, George Wilson, 
Jack Wallner, Frank Donovan, John MacPherson, Sam Sciortino, Ralph Spinuzzi. 



OFFICERS: Chuck Budinger, Pres., Roger Mullaney, Joe Fanganello 




The Saint John Berchman's Society, together with 
the Sodality, is the oldest organization on the cam- 
pus, having been inaugurated with the opening of 
classes in 1888. The purpose of the Society is to pro- 
mote and foster an intelligent participation in the 
liturgy of the Catholic Church. The principal means 
used to accomplish this through the years has been 
for members to act as servers for the Masses said 
daily on campus. In this way a deeper appreciation 
of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass has come about and 
the Mass takes a more and more significant place in 
daily life. To this the Society has added the fullest 
participation in the Sunday dialogue Masses in the 
Student Chapel. The sense of responsibility shown 
by its members is attested to by their regularly ap- 
pearing for the early morning Masses in one 
chapel or another. 

Although it is primarily a spiritual organiza- 
tion, the St. John Berchman's Society participates 
actively as a group in other affairs of the school 
and student body. 



86 













FIRST ROW: Joe McGowan, Ken McNealy, Roy Garcia, Ron Moschel, Tom Hopkins, Mike Crowley, Ed Feulner. SECOND ROW: Mike Ryan, Bert Sardello, Bill 
Brown, Greg Downey, Den Brown, Tom Conrad, Scot Bartosch, Mike Geile, Dean Stone. THIRD ROW: Tom Patterson, Mike Adamsen, Dick Stevens, Ron Gilg, 
Ray Schramm, Joe Weber, Steve Mahrohisky, Mike Clark, Bob Forest. 




GUARDIANS OF THE SANCTUARY 



87 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



O (~> O 




FRONT ROW: John McCoy, Bill Winks, Tom Schneider, Jim Taylor, Fred Alibi, Jack Gallagher. SECOND ROW: Jim Hackett, B. J. Dingman, Tom Brennan, 
Grant Wade, Tom Copps, Kevin O'Keefe. THIRD ROW: Fred Martin, Charles F. Brown, Pat O'Neill, John Hakes, Dick Salem, Jim Morrisroe. 



OFFICERS: Tom Schneider, Pat O'Neill, Jim Taylor, Don McNei 




Under the leadership of Jim Taylor the A.D.G. 
fraternity has found the school year of 60-61 a 
successful and rewarding one. Alpha Delta Gamma 
is the only social fraternity on the Regis campus. 
The aim of the fraternity within this framework is 
to produce outstanding examples of Catholic educa- 
tion who will become great leaders of tomorrow. 

Alpha Delta Gamma enjoys a large membership 
and is well known around campus. In the Coronation 
Ball it sponsors one of the outstanding social events 
of the school year. This year it had the added dis- 
tinction of bestowing the title of queen of Regis on 
its own candidate, Miss Carol Scuderi. This is but 
one of the events it sponsors, all social. Besides the 
Halloween Dance it conducted many informal 
smokers and Sunday morning Communion breakfasts 
for its members. 

As an affiliate of the national group the chapter 
sends some of its members to the annual conventions. 
Last year the Regis men of A.D.G. to a good num- 
ber went to New Orleans to attend the convention. 



SCHOOL, SERVICE, SOCIETY 



88 




FRONT ROW: Mike Edwards, John Herbert, Pete Schmitz, Tom Welsh, Dave Yezzi. SECOND ROW: Jim Saavedra, Dan McNeill, Tim Campion, Pat Gallagher, 
Chuck Jenkins. THIRD ROW: Dan Devereaux, Michael Costigan, Mike Doyle, Ed Coughlin, Dennis McDaniel, Pat Ryan. 




89 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 




FIRST ROW: Ken Joule, James Godfrey, Tom Tracy, Mike Wells, James Gottschalk. SECOND ROW: Chris O'Donnell, Bob Lennon, James Clark, Larry Black- 
ford, John Foley, John Kosednar. THIRD ROW: Terry LaNoue, Gordon Osteen, Bob Dietz, Pete O'Neal, Tom Linnebur, Joe Ryan. 



OFFICERS: Del Ellis, Mr. Sporcich, John Foley, Terry La Noue, Mike Wells, Bob 
Dietz 




Alpha Kappa Psi, the national business fraternity 
on campus, exists to instill into its members qualities 
of leadership in business and school activity. Its 
purposes, then, are to further the individual welfare 
of its members through the aspect of brotherhood, to 
foster scientific research in the fields of commerce 
and finance, and to promote and advance courses 
leading to degrees in business administration. 

The Gamma Sigma chapter of Regis participates 
actively in campus-wide activities. Besides its 
membership-limited banquets, smokers, and gather- 
ings, the fraternity promotes some social functions 
open to the general school attendance. The most 
noteworthy function of the year was the annual 
Presentation Ball held during the early part of 
the school year. 

This year, Gamma Sigma chapter was awarded 
the gold plaque from national headquarters in recog- 
nition of its achievements in efficient operation. The 
Regis chapter placed first as a result of the 
nation-wide evaluation. 



90 




FIRST ROW: Jim Bennett, Jim Lindeman, Phil Archibeck, Ray Lamy, Mike Ewers. SECOND ROW: Ed Feulner, Bill Graefe, Del Ellis, John Greiten, Dan Kammer, 
Mr. Sporcich. THIRD ROW: Leo Huppert, Paul Maley, Lou Gallipeau, Bill Schmitz, Doug Kent, Mike Quinn. 




BUSINESSMEN ALL 



91 



LITERARY CLUB 




FIRST ROW: Tom Mety, Joe Tarabino, Don Kirsch, Leroy Garcia. SECOND ROW: John Koester, Bob Cook, Tom Remington, John Gribben. THIRD ROW: 
Tom Koester, Don Sowden, Jerry Boyle. 



OFFICERS: Bob Cook, Tom Remington, John Gribb ;n 




The basic aim of the Literary Club is to stimulate 
contemplation and discussion of the best in con- 
temporary and classical literature. This is done not 
only for the benefit of the members within the club, 
but also for all interested in this subject. Towards 
furthering this objective discussion groups are or- 
ganized with members of other schools in the area, 
lectures my many of today's foremost literary authori- 
ties are brought to the campus, by participating in 
numerous seminars on and off campus, and, finally 
by appearing occasionally on the Regis television 
program "Today at Regis." 

The major activity of the club this year has 
been the organization and promotion of the first 
literary magazine on campus. It is a move to ex- 
press the creative efforts of the students as well as 
to encourage new expressions. The first issue, pub- 
lished through the cooperation of the Regis Roundup 
Magazine, showed the entire school, its alumni and 
friends the intellectual progress in this field that the 
school has made in recent years. 



POETS-NOVELISTS-CRITICS 



92 



AQUINAS CLUB 




George Reid, Bill Belford, Charles Sutherland, Paul Horan, George Miller, Pal Kosmicki. 



OFFICERS: Robert Connelly, Fr. Klocker, Robert Pipkin 



... 




The purpose of the Aquinas Academy is to stimu- 
late members' insight into the varied and the complex 
problems of Philosophy. To maintain the aim and 
standard of the club, members are selected under 
rigid academic requirements. 

Membership in the Aquinas Academy is com- 
posed of honor students at Regis who are either 
Philosophy Majors or students who display a special 
interest in the field. These students are joined by 
Regis faculty members and interested local area 
men and women. 

Under the direction of Rev. Harry Klocker, S.J., 
head of the Regis philosophy department, the club 
read and discusses representative works from the 
ancient, the medieval and the modern periods 
of Philosophy. 

All members are encouraged to actively partici- 
pate in the lectures and discussions with individual 
research, study, and public presentation to the 
membership of the Academy and faculty panels. 

Projective analysis and discussion of such topics 
as the "Nature of the State" in relation to the re- 
corded thought of the world's great philosophers 
is the continued endeavor of the Academy members. 



ST. THOMAS' PROTEGES 



93 



RADIO KREG 




FIRST ROW: John Stark, Mike Sherman, John Mura, Jim Curtan, Pete Borer. SECOND ROW: Mike Lochner, Anthony Klug, Bil 
Farley. THIRD ROW: Tim Kimsey, David Maradei, Jerry Boyle, John Fletcher, John Chandler. 



Buckley, Pat Eicker, Phil 



OFFICERS: Mike Sherman, Tim Kimsey, Bill Graefe, John Gerlach, John Mura 




This last year, KREG, the Regis College campus 
radio station, has undergone an expansion program 
which has broadened the scope of its service to the 
student body. From Sunday to Friday, KREG op- 
erates with the contributed time and talents of 
some fifty disc jockeys, news commentators, inter- 
viewers, announcers and engineers. 

The newly-created directorial positions in the 
News and Editorial Departments have provided a 
greater depth of the programming than previously 
was possible. Under the direction of the newly 
formed Editorial Department, the "voice of Regis 
College" has presented the "KREG Lecture Hall." 
This series brought to its listeners a greater di- 
mension of collegiate culture. KREG has continued 
to present to its listeners music programmed par- 
ticularly for the college student. 

In keeping with its policy of "full spectrum radio," 
another new service offered by KREG this year was 
the rental of records to campus organizations and 
to individual students. 

Officers for the past year were: William Graefe, 
station manager; John Mura, program director; John 
Gerlach, publicity director; and Reverend Joseph V. 
Downey, S.J., moderator. 



94 




FRONT ROW: Gary Potter, Joe Fanganello, Mark Haffey, Paul Harrer, Fred Albi, Mike Barbich. SECOND ROW: Tom Scaglia, Cornell Wamser, Rich Rudolph, 
Ron Davlin, Larry Schmitt, Mike Donnelly. THIRD ROW: Paul Horan, Fred Martin, Bill Struck, Carl Sullivan, Mike Amman, George Twining. 




ers in action 



CRESTERS OF THE WEST 



w 



BENCHWARMERS 




FRONT ROW: Dan Dalpes, Anthony Finnerty, Joseph Burke, Mike Doyle. SECOND ROW: Jerry Arndorfer, Jim Figge, Joe Fanganello, John Murphy, John 
Herzog. THIRD ROW: Par Quinnt, Bill Graefe, Jack Becker, Sam Sciorlino. 



OFFICERS: Bob Eaton, Dave Cullan, Mike Costigan, Anthony Finnerty. 




The Benchwarmers began two years ago as the 
Boosters. They have changed their name but not 
their objective — boosting student participation in 
every all-College function but especially athletics. 
The wide variety of activities the Benchwarmers en- 
gage in embraces both cheer leading and dance 
promotion. Every game found a solid mass of Bench- 
warmers screaming its lungs out and helping to 
snatch victory out of a game crisis. Moments later 
that same vigorous group was serenely enjoying a 
post-game dance. At other times under Bench- 
warmer inspiration a giant caravan set out across 
the Bocky Mountains to follow the team into 
Utah or Idaho. 

Some of the success of the Benchwarmers is due 
to the able cooperation of girls from Loretto Heights. 
They form half the cheerleader corps. In the stands 
many more of the girls joined the Benchwarmers 
cheering on the Bangers. 

The enthusiasm of the Benchwarmers is con- 
tagious. This year almost thirty-five percent of 
the student body belonged to the club. Two years 
ago not more than ten percent of the student body 
initiated the organization. 



100 




FIRST ROW: Dave Cullan, Max Kudar, Fred Reichert, Pete Borer. SECOND ROW: Dennis Dalpes, Pete O'Neal, Bob Eaton, Larry Nau, Rich Feely. THIRD 
ROW: Jim Fisher, Mike Costigan, Morrill Murphy, Lou Gallipeau. 



Coach Hall enlivens Benchwarmer mixer 




DEVOTED FOLLOWERS 



101 



. 



LETTERMAN CLUB 




FIRST ROW: Vince Bocklage, Bill Kelly, Dick Barteau, Jerry Sherman, Darryl Bartz, Craig Hibbison. SECOND ROW: Tom Malley, Bob Wheeler, Chuck Swan- 
son, Dick Hoogerwerf, Dean Sullivan, Paul Frey, Gary DeMarlie, Larry Nau. 



OFFICERS: Paul Frey, Don Ricken, Jerry Sherman, Pres., Gary DeMarlie 




The men who have earned a major or minor letter 
in some form of competitive sport are given the 
recognition they deserve through membership in 
this exclusive club. The ambition and interest of 
its members, especially the varsity lettermen, has 
achieved for Regis an outstanding reputation in the 
field of competitive athletics. These are the men 
who set the standards which contributed toward 
Regis' classification in the university level of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association. 

The R Club has gradually increased its activity 
until now its asserts a strong influence in athletics 
generally in the school. The intramural program, 
league and tournament play, is directed by its mem- 
bers. All of this is aimed toward a greater interest 
in and participation in sports by those who do not 
desire inter-collegiate competition. 



MEN OF BRAINS AND BRAWN 



102 



ITALIAN CLUB 




FIRST ROW: Bill Houston, Joe Pedofto, Joe Mandarino, John Mura, Joe Fanganello, Mark Haffey, Al Rossi. SECOND ROW: Jerry Long, Tom Scaglia, Dave 
Marader, Chuck Luna, Mike Marotta, John Fletcher. THIRD ROW: Chuck Dalla, Tony Stegall, Joe Immordino, Tim Kimsey, Gary Sauen, Jerry Gerome. 



OFFICERS: Tom Scaglia, Jerry Long, Al Rossi, Pres., George Falagrady, Joe 
Fanganello 




Membership and activity constituted the dual 
goal for which the Italian Club successfully strove 
during the past year. Al Rossi, president of the or- 
ganization, speerheaded a membership drive that 
saw a terrific upsurge in active members of the 
Italian Club. 

With the addition of the new spirit brought by 
the "younger blood," the Italian Club began to take 
an increasingly active part in campus activity 
at Regis. 

The highlight of the club's social activity was 
reached when Janet Gaglia, Italian Club Queen, 
was featured as an attendant at the Coronation Rail 
of 1960. To further the cultural aspirations of its 
members, the Italian Club sponsored a dinner at 
which the Italian consul spoke. 

In the future, the Italian Club hopes to continue 
its expanding membership program as well as to 
sponsor further lectures. 

Other officers elected for the Italian Club during 
the past year were George Falagrady, Vice-president; 
Tom Scaglia, Secretary; Jerry Long, Treasurer; and 
Joe Fanganello, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



SONS OF ITALY 



103 



PLAYHOUSE CLUB 




FIRST ROW: Mary Verhulst, Casey Cuthbertson, Sue Simone, Carol Conley, Kathy Robinson, Mary Jo Catlett. SECOND ROW: Jim Casebolt, Bill Souba, Bill 
Brown, Dean Stone, Paul McShane. THIRD ROW: Rich Feely, Gil Rael, Tom Downing, John Peto, Dan McNally. 



OFFICERS: Dennis Gallagher, Larry Clinton, Father Deeman, Cornell Wamser 




The theatrical bent of Regis students finds more 
than satisfactory outlet in the Playhouse. Established 
along professional lines, the Playhouse makes availa- 
ble to the interested student training in most of the 
fields of dramatic presentation — acting, set construc- 
tion, promotion, and sales. Some of its members also 
do scenarios for presentation by other organizations 
on campus. 

Although this year's endeavor was controversial, 
it nevertheless brought to the campus modem the- 
ater almost directly from Broadway. Ketti Frings' 
Look Homeward Angel, based on Thomas Wolfe's 
novel, was the Playhouse's interesting experiment. 
Many believed that it was the most interesting yet 
attempted by the Playhouse although modern Broad- 
way drama has usually been its choice in recent years. 

Another novel experiment was done during the 
second semester. The group utilized the new field- 
house facilities to do theater-in-the-round, a favorite 
experiment on many campuses in the country. Re- 
action was non-committal but more experience with 
this type of theater should produce more definite 
opinions. 



DRAMATIC MEN AND GIRLS 



104 



STUDENTS NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 




FIRST ROW: Mike Haley, Roger Milbert, Jim Brisneha, Chuck Swanson. SECOND ROW: Ron Davlin, John Lyons, Mike Amman, Larry Clinton, Fred Reiehert. 
THIRD ROW: Ted Tsumura, Mike Barbich, Bob Christensen, Bernard O'Lear. 



OFFICERS: John Lyons, Ted Tsumura, Bernard O'Lear, Larry Clinton 




The Student National Educational Association is 
a student affiliate of the larger, parent organization 
of teachers, the National Education Association. As 
such it endeavors to provide future teachers with 
special opportunities and experiences that will con- 
tribute toward a better, more effective teacher. 
Seminars, visits to schools, teaching in various in- 
stitutions, opportunities for public speaking and to 
participate in local, state and national conventions 
are all part of the organization's teacher enrich- 
ment program. 

The Student National Education Association is a 
professional club with specific, educational goals in 
view. Its opportunities for embracing the whole stu- 
dent body in such activities are limited. However, 
the school does share in its efforts, particularly at 
registration time and in the conducting of the various 
placement tests. It also contributes heavily to sum- 
mer school programs for elementary school children. 



FUTURE DONS 



105 



BROWN AND GOLD NEWSPAPER 




FIRST ROW: Tom Schneider, Jim Waters, Ron Moschel, Jerry King, Mike Mayer, Ed Feulner. SECOND ROW: Tim Campion, George Miller, Pat Kosmiclci, Larry 
Taylor, John Foley. 



EDITORIAL BOARD: Larry Taylor, Jim Waters, Fr. Wintergalen, Tom Schneider 




The student newspaper, issued bi-weekly, pre- 
sents the Catholic College approach to campus news 
as well as interesting editorial commentaries on the 
national and international scene. 

Under Jim Waters, editor, the BROWN and 
GOLD achieved a new high in the past year, par- 
ticularly in regard to sound reporting and thought- 
provoking editorials. Tom Schneider, sports editor, 
expanded his section of the paper and made it one 
of the highlights of each issue. 

Ed Feulner, heading the photography staff, saw to 
it that the BROWN and GOLD never lacked inter- 
esting and pertinent pictures of all campus activities. 

Father E. H. Wintergalen, S. J., by coordinating 
the efforts of the talented staff of the B&G, saw to it 
that the newspaper fulfilled its function of being an 
accurate and interesting chronicle of the past school 
year at Regis College. By constantly consulting each 
campus organization, as well as the sources for ad- 
ministrative and academic news, the BROWN and 
GOLD provided readers with complete campus 
coverage. 



106 




Taskmaster Waters drives for a deadline 




ALL THE NEWS THAT FIT . . 



107 



RHO CHI SIGMA 




Dooher, R. Straw, P. O'Mearo. SECOND ROW: J. Pedotto, J. Gisler, J. Yax. THIRD ROW: R. Spinuzzi, D. Sussman, D. Thill, M. Reincke. 



OFFICERS: B. Eaton, P. O'Meara, J. Yax, D. Otero, J. Jones. 








Rho Chi Sigma is a science fraternity primarily 
devoted to the scientific education and Christian 
intellectual development of its members. The fra- 
ternity was founded in 1946 by Rev. Louis Keenoy, 
SJ. The moderator of the fraternity at present is 
Dr. Francis Ozog. Rho Chi Sigma is affiliated with 
the American Chemical Society. 

The membership of the fraternity is composed 
of those students who manifest a special interest in 
chemistry or who intend to major in this subject. 
For these students Rho Chi Sigma strives to create 
a desire for the knowledge of science especially in 
the field of chemistry and to establish sound intel- 
lectual achievement among its members. The fra- 
ternity has guest and student lecturers during meet- 
ings and during the school year the members tour 
various plants in and around Denver which they 
think will enlarge their knowledge of their field. 

At last year's honors banquet the fraternity re- 
ceived the Outstanding Organization Award and 
several of its members were presented with awards 
at the banquet. 



, i 



108 




FRONT ROW: B. Kraus, R. Distel, P. Moore, M. Dunn. SECOND ROW: J. Yax, D. Otero, B. Eaton, J. Rauen. THIRD ROW: J. Arndorfer, J. Jones, B. Belford, 
B. Pipkin. 



Interesting, eh what! 




NEW THINGS THROUGH CHEMISTRY 



109 



RANGER 




R Burnson, Burke McDonald, D. Dalpes, Sam Sciortino, Ray Schram. FRONT ROW: Michael Crowley, Thomas Crulcher, James Trecker, Thomas Savage, 
John Hession. 



James Hartman 




Compiling the Ranger is a tedious task. You 
have to haggle for pictures, pester for copy, and 
put up with the "human element." Out of all that 
comes the book— for better or for worse. 

The organization of the Ranger was changed 
this year. Where once a sole editor was re- 
sponsible for the whole book, there now are six 
co-editors to handle the major sections of the book. 
This new system worked well and it promises even 
better results when all the "kinks" of changeover 
have been worked out. 

When the pencils are laid down and the well- 
worn erasers are carefully stored away, when the 
cameras are out into their containers, when the 
darkroom is once again opened to the relief of fresh 
air, then it must be acknowledged that it was fun and 
a pleasant experience not too easily forgotten. 




110 





DENNIS KIEFER 



THOMAS YAX 





A 



GEORGE RIFF 





<pr^r<*>^? 



EDWIN FEULNER 





M': 
DONALD MILDENBERGER 



PICTURES ! PICTURES ! PICTURES ! 



in 




Ed Cliton, '61 




Jim Godfrey, '61 




Jim Gottschalk, '61 



Specialty 



We believe the men singled out from 
the student body and included on these 
pages are representative of a type of student 
that the school can be especially proud of. 
These are the "yeomen," men who give 
themselves to the success of Regis and all 





Fred Albi, '62 



Ray Cheeney, '62 



Paul Horan, '61 



@&04,ea 



her activities. Seldom have they had ac- 
claim or fame; never have they stinted in 
their dedication. To honor them is to honor 
all the others of like dedication. This we 
do now. 



Leo Huppert, '61 



Pete McLaughlin, '61 




Jerry Schropfer, '61 



Dennis Kiefer, '63 



Fred Reichert, '62 



Ken Williams, '61 








'/■:■' /StSa*E.'l. 



H 



ATHLETICS 




BOOSTERS 






In their second year of operation, the Bench- 
warmers continued their drive to bolster the 
spirit of Regis. Aided by the completion of 
Regis' new field house, the Benchwarmers 
achieved an all time high in spirit and enthusi- 
asm. The result of this spirit can be seen in 
the Rangers fine performance on their home 
court. 

Half-time entertainment, pep rallies, cara- 
vans, and post-game dances were all contribu- 
tory factors in maintaining a high degree of 
enthusiasm throughout the basketball season. 
Such activities helped to further unite the stu- 
dent bodies of Regis and Loretto Heights, 
doubling the number of voices cheering the 
players to victory. 

Ten cheerleaders led the Ranger fans with 
bouyant, spirited yells. The five lovelies from 
Loretto were Elaine Leroux, Sue Fath, Jane 
Poeling, Joanne Dehner, and Barbara Brant. 
Regis men who led yells were Joe Fanganello, 
John Herzog, Bill Thiede, John Desmond, and 
Tom Dieveney. 




CHEERLEADERS— Left to Right-Barbara Brant, Jane Poeling, Elaine Leroux, Sue Fath, Joanne Dehner, John Desmond, John Herzog, Bill Thiede, Tor 
Dieveney. 



116 




i i; 



FIELDHOUSE 
ACTIVITIES 



After years and months of waiting, the new Regis 
College Fieldhouse was finally completed. With its 
completion, the athletic activity of the student body was 
greatly increased. However, because of the newness of 
the fieldhouse, it was some time before all of its fa- 
cilities were open for student use. 

Opportunities for swimming, handball, weightlift- 
ing, and steambathing now were available to anyone 
wishing to "get in shape." Along with these, there was 
inauguarated a more intensified intramural program. 
Besides intramural football, basketball, and baseball, 
there was initiated a highly competitive tournament to 
discover the top handball player in the school. 

On certain days, the Regis Fieldhouse was also 
opened to the general public. Because of this the name 
of Regis was most certainly spread throughout the city 
as it had never been before. 

Perhaps the most important result of the fieldhouse's 
completion was the fact that at last the Rangers had a 
home. The significance of this is shown in the Ranger's 
performance at home where they won eight while losing 
only two. 





1 1! 




1 If) 



RANGER COACHES 




ASSISTANT COACH-Bill Kaleher, HEAD COACH-Joe Hall 



In his second season as head coach, Joe Hall, in- 
herited a team composed almost entirely of Sopho- 
mores and Juniors. His only returning Senior was 
reserve forward Kenny Williams. Hall still managed 
to mold this young inexperienced team into a very 
respectable threat to any opponent. 

While masterminding his varsity to a creditable 
10-10 record, which included victories over such 
highly regarded teams as Colorado State University, 
Creighton University, and Idaho State College, 
Coach Hall also served as athletic director and 
physical education instructor. 

During the spring and summer months Coach 
Hall will be busy scouting around the country in 
search of talent for the coming year. With a full 
squad of veterans returning and some promising 
Freshmen up from the J.V.'s, Hall is eagerly looking 
forward to next season. 

Hall's assistant, Arthur W. Kaleher also just 
completed his second year at Regis College. Kaleher 
was head coach of the J.V.'s as well as swimming 
coach, director of intramurals, and physical educa- 
tion instructor. His J.V.'s had a very successful 
7-3 record. 



During every game the coach dies a thousand deaths. Here, during the course of a tight game, Coach Hall mirrors the emotion and 
frustration endured by every coach. 




120 




Coach Hall briefs team before opening tip-off. 



One of the many duties of an assistant coach is that of trainer. Here Coach KaSeher tapes Bill Kelly's ankle. 






jf V 







121 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 



Score Board 



Regis 


56 


Denver U. 


57 


Regis 


68 


Montana State College 


69 


Regis 


64 


Denver U. 


56 


Regis 


78 


Gonzaga U. 


8] 


Regis 


68 


Colorado State U. 


57 


Regis 


66 


Nevada U. 


77 


Regis 


62 


Colorado State U. 


77 


Regis 


69 


Westminster College 


07 


Regis 


1-2 


Arizona State U. 


80 


Regis 


76 


St. Ambrose College 


64 


Regis 


61 


Arizona U. 


79 


Regis 


93 


New Mexico Highlands 


59 


Regis 


65 


St. Michael's College 


61 


Regis 


76 


Creighton U. 


01 


Regis 


78 


Washington U. 


60 


Regis 


70 


Idaho State College 


55 


Regis 


81 


Montana State College 


64 


Regis 


64 


Air Force Academy 


07 


Regis 


65 


Idaho State College 


96 
Won-10 


Regis 
Lost-10 


77 


Arizona State U. 


SO 



THE TEAM-Back Row-Assistant Coach, A. Kaleher, D. Schreiner, T. Kojis, D. Ricken, R. Mahaffey, J. Miller, A. Thomas, J. O'Keefe, R. Belmont, W. Whalen, 
Head Coach, J. Hall. Front Row— G. Demarlie, P. Frey, K. Williams, L. Stout, Manager-L. Nau, J. Jones, W. Kelly, Manager— W. Schmitz, D. Bartz, J. Sherman, 
D. Hoogerwarf, D. Sullivan. 




123 




K1 



DeMarlie seems disgusted as a tall C.S.U. forward captures the rebound and starts 
down the floor. 

Regis revived a long standing feud with Denver 
University to open the 1960-1961 season at the Den- 
ver U. arena. The young Rangers started slowly but 
warmed to their task and took a 27-26 half time lead. 
For a while in the second half the Rangers lost their 
touch and found themselves nine points behind late 
in the game. With three minutes and fifty seconds 
left in the game, the determined Rangers led by Paul 
Frey and Dean Sullivan clamped an effective half- 
court press which nearly pulled the game out of the 



fire. James Jones had the last chance to pull the 
struggling Rangers even when with six seconds re- 
maining he swished the first of two free throws to 
make the score the final 57-56. Then his second free 
throw bounced high into the air and the Rangers 
had gone down to defeat. 

Two nights later Regis had an opportunity to 
avenge the defeat in the dedication game of the 
new fieldhouse. The game was played for the Queen 
City trophy given by Denver's Mayor Batterton. 
The fired up Rangers were not to be denied in this 
ball game. They jumped to a quick ten point margin 
when Jerry Sherman, Louis Stout, Dean Sullivan, 
Paul Frey, and James Jones began to play as a team. 
Another of those cold spells allowed the Denver U. 
team to cut the halftime score to 36-31, Regis. The 
scrappy team came out in the second half and added 
four points to their halftime lead and ended up with 
a 64-56 win. A trio of sophomores, Jones, Stout, and 
Sullivan hit in the double figures to lead the team in 
this effort. 

The third straight game against a Skyline Con- 
ference team had the Rangers playing the unbeaten 
Rams from Colorado State University, who boasted 
one of the top players in the Rocky Mountain area, 
high-flying center Bill Green. Bill scored thirty-two 
points against Regis. The home team was led by 
Stout who collected twenty-three points and broke 
his own school record with twenty-one rebounds. 
This game was marked by rough, aggressive play 
on the part of both teams. The Rangers held a ten 
point lead with ten minutes left in the game. They 
proceeded to go into a stall that actually enabled 
them to increase their lead to eleven points. The 
last ten points were scored on free throws, Gary De 
Marlie sinking six out of six during the period. The 
Coach and team was well pleased with this 68-57 
win. 



Junior Paul Frey often sparked the Rangers with ag- 
gressive floor play and tireless energy. 



Bill Kelly, reserve center, greatly aided the Ranger cause 
with his rugged rebounding. 



Sophomore Dean Sullivan contributed to many Regi 
victories with timely baskets and hustling defense. 





125 





Kells adjusts sights. 



Dean "takes off" after loose ball. 



Lou snares one as C.S.U.'s Green gives blessing. 



*%d 



R£ 



30 




"Aren't you glad you used Dial? Don't you wish every- 
one did?" 




Starting Center Jim Jones showed constant im- 
provement throughout the season and was Regis' 
second leading scorer and rebounder. 



Firey Guard Gary Demarle came into his own dur- 
ing the second half of the campaign and greatly 
aided the Ranger cause. 



Set shot artist Dick Hoogerwerf was always reliable 
in the clutch with his fine playmaking. 



Ken Williams goes up with defender in attempt to 
snag a rebound. 






Sherman and Washington opponent watch ball head for basket. 



DeMarle lunges for ball as Sherman and Jones close in. 





Senior Kenny Williams led the Regis rebounding 
ecord with twenty-one against Westminister. 



Junior Jerry Sherman strengthened the forward 
wall with his consistent play. 



Sophomore Louis Stout led the Hallmen in scoring 
throughout the season. 



Hoogs attempts to break deadlock against Washington U 



A vengeful C.S.U. quintet met the Rangers as 
they journeyed to Fort Collins for their second 
battle with the onee-beaten Rams. Lou Stout 
dropped in a total of 14 points for the Regis cause, 
but saw Rill Green, lanky Ram center, double his 
total as he hit for 28 points in a 77-62 C.S.U. victory. 

The Arizona State game at Tempe proved no 
better for the Rangers. Though led by spirited guard 
Dean Sullivan's 20 points, the Rangers once again 
tasted defeat by a 12 point margin, 82-70. Regis 
was dealt a double blow as the hustling Sullivan, 
the game's high scorer, suffered an injured knee and 
was lost indefinitely. 

The Arizona U. tilt produced no better results 
than did the A.S.U. game. Guard Gary DeMarlie's 
13 points were not enough as the Rangers once 
again were defeated, this time by a score of 79-61. 
The Regis squad proceeded from Tucson to Santa 
Fe, New Mexico, for a clash with St. Michael's 
College. 

The St. Michael game saw the return of Louis 
Stout, honorable mention All-American, to the scor- 
ing ranks. Lanky Lou canned a total of 20 points 
and his return to form sparked the Ranger squad to 
a 65-61 victorv over their New Mexico adversaries. 

Roistered by the support of the Renchwarmers, 
the Rangers returned their backing with a 78-69 
shellacking of Washington University of St. Louis. 
The Washington game produced vet another po- 
tential star in the person of Ren Wesley, who pro- 
vided Coach Hall with 21 points for the eve- 
ning's performance. 





Jones stretches to get shot off against C.S.U. 



Kelly among foes. 



January 13 saw the initial encounter between 
Regis and Montana State at the Regis College Field- 
house. The Ranger record of straight wins was 
preserved as they downed their adversaries by the 
score of 81-64. Not only did the visitors have to con- 
tend with Lou Stout, as they expected, but his lanky 
teammate Jim Jones very definitely made his pres- 
ence felt. Stout split the cords for 21 points and 
Jones topped this with a total of 24. This double- 
barreled punch was too much for Montana State as 
the Rangers chalked up another victory in their 
quest for fame. 

The Rangers returned to action on February 2 
at Pocatello, Idaho, after a long layoff. The con- 
sequences of such an expended period of inactivity 
were evident as the Hallmen absorbed their worst 
defeat of the campaign, 96-65. The Idaho State 
game produced yet another new face in the scoring 
annals of Ranger history as rugged Rill Kelly paced 
the Regis hoopsters with a total of 14 points. Con- 
spicuous by its absence from the post-game scoring 
totals was the familiar name of Lou Stout. 

Following the game of the second, the Ranger 
quintet journeyed to Rozeman, Montana, for a re- 
turn engagement with the team which they had 
humbled at the Regis Fieldhouse in January. The 
hosts, Montana State College, were far from gracious 
as they tipped the Hallmen by the score of 69-68. 
Jim Jones once more furnished his typical fine effort 
and led the scorers with 10 points, but this was 
evidently not enough as Regis once more tasted de- 
feat on the road. 

The third game in six days, this one being played 
on February 6, saw a wearied Ranger squad journey 
to Spokane, Washington, for a tilt with Gonzaga. 
Once more the clearing of the battle debris found a 
new name atop the scoring column for the Rangers. 
5'9" Gary DeMarlie sent 21 points through the 
orange oval and Lou Stout contributed 20. The 
all-out efforts of these two men were shadowed by a 
33-point production by the Gonzaga shooting ma- 
chine, Frank Rurgess, and the resultant loss by the 
score of 81-78. 




130 




Sullivan appears to be "eating the ball" when hit with an unexpected 
pass. 



Sherman surrounded. 




From Spokane the Rangers traveled to Reno, 
Nevada with an encounter with the University of 
Nevada. The gambling and game Rangers found 
the odds once more against them as they again tasted 
defeat on the road, this time by the score of 77-66. 

The thought of returning home or some other in- 
spiring force must have motivated the Rangers as 
they bounced back from the Nevada defeat to top 
the host Westminster College in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. Two more standouts emerged from the thick 
of combat as Jerry Sherman and Gary DeMarlie tied 
for game scoring honors with 21 points apiece. It 
was also in the Westminster game that senior Kenny 
Williams swept both the offensive and defensive 
backboards with a spirit typical of his play and in 
so doing set a Regis College record as he snagged 
21 rebounds. 

The St. Ambrose Rees invaded Rangerland on 
February 15 and ran into a red-hot Lou Stout who 
rammed home 23 points as Regis downed their Iowa 
opponents by the score of 76-64. Stout saw his total 
matched by Rohls of Ambrose, who also hit for a 
total of 23 points. 

Ranger point production soared to a season high 
as the Hallmen blistered the nets for 93 points in a 
93-59 rout of the New Mexico Highlands University. 
Stout once more came through with a brilliant 24- 
point production and leaped his way to hauling in 
27 rebounds as the Regis quintet demonstrated a 
devestating attack. 

Creighton University entered their game with 
the Rangers as solid favorites. Despite a poor won- 
lost record, these losses had been dealt them by such 
perennial powerhouses as Iowa, Indiana, Illinois, 
Marquette, and St. Louis University. It was an ap- 
parently disrespectful Regis five that would not play 
doormat for the visitors as they turned on former 
Ranger Herb Millard & Co. and presented them with 
a 76-64 defeat. Lou Stout led the Rangers and all 
scorers as he hit for 17 points. 




Coach Kaleher seems disgusted with the games progress. 



131 





Louie clears the area in an attempt to capture the rebound. 



Stout continued his deadeye shooting in the next 
game against Idaho State as he canned 26 big points 
as the Hallmen rolled over Idaho State by a score 
of 70-55. The losers were paced by the 20 points of 
Frank Swopes. This win was extremely costly for 
the Rangers. The services of potential All-American 
Lou Stout were lost for the remainder of the season 
as the former Kentucky high school great injured 
both ankles with only 8 seconds left in the game. 

The game of the year, with the winged wonders 
from the south, was supposedly made easier, ac- 
cording to A.F.A. coach Spear, by the loss of Stout 
and Sullivan. The game itself was a tribute to the 
knowledge of the Air Academy coach as he found 
his boys trailing 64-63 with less than a minute to go. 
This lead was largely the result of the emergence of 
consistent Jerry Sherman into the athletic limelight 
as he single-handedly nearly filed the feathers off 
the fabled falcon with a 21 point effort. Not to be 
overlooked by any means were the spectaculor soar- 
ing tip-ins of Ben Wesley and his excellent floor play. 

The Arizona State Sun Devils was the inevitable 
let down after such a tremendous effort against the 
A.F.A. Though Senior Kenny Williams poured in 9 
points in the first 10 minutes and Jerry Sherman 
played another great game, the Regis five left the 
floor 8 points down at the half. This was largely due 
to the outshooting of little Larry Armstrong, who 
finished the game with 27 points for high honors 
though pushed by Sherman's production of 22 for 
the Regis cause. Though the Rangers lost this one 
by an 86-77 score, it became more evident that 
Coach Hall was right when he claimed that "the 
Air Force should be our last game." 








V. 






SOCCER 



-^ .„.: '*??*-:- * & 



This year a new sport was established at Regis. 
Initiated and supported by the Irish Regis Associa- 
tion, soccer has become a growing sport at Regis. 
As a member of the Colorado State Soccer Associa- 
tion, the Regis team is undefeated and once tied in 
their first four games, and is leading the league. If 
the team proves itself this year, soccer will be recog- 
nized as a minor and an intramural sport, and all 
concerned are working toward this goal. The im- 
mediate goal is the 'B" league championship and 
trophy, a crowning achievement for a first year 
team. 

Coached by volunteer David Jacobson, an en- 
thusiastic Denver promoter, assisted by student 
coach, Bob Pfeffle, and moderated by Fr. Lynch, 
the Irishmen, with veterans Pete O'Neal, John 
Herzog, Dan Devereaux, John Mahoney, and goalie 
Bob Barnicle have provided experience and com- 
petitive spirit for every opponent met thus far. Co- 
captains this year are Rich Block, ace defensive full- 
back, and George Wilson, who along with Wayne 
Honebrink, is the team's leading scorer. 



Goalie Bob Barnicle dives to prevent score. 



Rich Thill prepares to deflect ball away from goal. 







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134 







Four "Irishmen" determine to stop opponent's progress. 



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Long legs and big feet prove to be an ad- 
vantage in soccer. 




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135 




VARSITY BASEBALL 



In his first season as head coach Joe Hall in- 
herited a team composed entirely of underclassmen. 
He still managed to guide the Rangers to a very 
creditable record of seven wins and five losses 
against such highly regarded area teams as the Uni- 
versity of Colorado, The Air Force Academy, and 
Colorado Mines. The team started slowly and 
showed considerable improvement throughout the 
season. 

The big bats in the Ranger attack belonged to 
freshman Chuck Swanson, who led the team with a 
.360 batting average and Frank Blatter who was close 
behind with a .349 average. Dick Barteau hit .340 
and also led the team with five homeruns. Rick 
Rudolph and Jerry Theisen contributed some im- 
portant defensive play. Jim Jones and Chuck Swan- 
son carried the brunt of the pitching chores. 

With a crew of eleven returning veterans Coach 
Hall is looking forward to a very successful season 
this year. 



Jones connects against Air Force. 



VARSITY BASEBALL— First Row: Jerry Theisen, Bob Wheeler, Frank Blatter, George Falagrady, Jerry Tellez, John McCoy, James Jones, Dave Cullen. Second Row: Rick 
Rudolph, Chuck Swanson, Dick Barteau, Al Rossi, Dean Sullivan, Pat Jenkins, Joe Fanganello, Larry Nau, Manager. 





Players watch with mixed emotions as Regis falls to Air Force 

SCORE BOARD 

Won 7 - Lost 5 

Regis — 9 Colorado Mines — 7 

Regis — 3 Colorado Univ. — 17 

Regis — 8 Colorado Mines — 9 

Regis — 6 Colorado Mines — 5 

Regis — 9 Western State — 4 

Regis — 10 Western State — 11 

Regis — 11 Adams State — 10 

Regis — 6 Adams State — 5 

Regis — 7 Colorado Mines — 6 

Regis — 7 Colorado Mines — 2 

Regis — Air Force — 2 

Regis — 8 Air Force — 12 

McCoy scores against Air Force as a Falcon bobbles the ball 



- 




137 



TENNIS TEAM 




GOLF TEAM 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Dave McNelis, Tom Denny, Jack Wallner, Gary Potter, Tony Klug, Lou Gallipeau. 



GERRY DOOHER 



ROB WHEELER 



TOM HITZELRERGER 



mx 






139 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



Junior varsity competition provides training and 
experience for underclassmen trying to make the 
varsity squad. Often the success or failure of future 
varsity teams is reflected in the accomplishments 
of the Jayvees. If this is so, the future of Regis 
basketball looks extremely bright. 

Directed by Coach Bill Kalehcr, the Jayvees 
posted a fine 7-3 record for the season. Displaying 
a high scoring punch and balanced floor play, the 
junior Rangers met and defeated such worthy op- 
ponents as the junior varsity teams of Colorado 
State University and Denver University. Because of 
their fine showing with the Jayvees, Ben Wesley, Al- 
len Thomas, and Bill Walen were moved up to the 
varsity where they turned in many creditable 
performances. 



Score Board 



Regis 


94 


Regis 


71 


Regis 


126 


Regis 


77 


Regis 


54 


Regis 


93 


Regis 


83 


Regis 


63 


Regis 


74 


Regis 


62 



Rocky Mt. Arsenal 32 

Colorado Mines 55 

Rocky Mt. Arsenal 51 

Lovvry A.F.B. 84 

Colorado State U. 75 

Fitzsimmons 55 

Lowry A.F.B. 92 

Colorado Mines 58 

Denver U. 73 

Colorado State U. 43 



"You hit him high, 
I'll hit him low." 



140 






Deadly shooting makes Ron Mahaffey a top varsity prospect. 



Bill Whalen has shown varsity talent by his playmaking and 
ball control. 



Allen Thomas goes high for two. 




14 1 



.^mm 





The extra inch, the extra step, often makes the difference between winning and losing. 



142 




Don Ricken provided steady scoring and rugged re- 
bounding from his forward position. 



Allen Thomas showed great promise and saw action 
with both Jayvee's and Varsity. 



Tom Kojis, freshman guard, guided the Jayvees 
through a most successful season. 




John Greiten gets one off against Lowry. 



143 




144 



SKIING 



The first snow, plaster casts, and crutches are sure 
signs that the skiing season is once again with us. De- 
spite the accidents and expense involved, skiing is 
continually the favorite outdoor sport of Regis students. 

From late Fall to early Spring Regians migrate to 
the slopes of Aspen, Loveland, Winter Park, and 
Berthould pass which offer some of the finest skiing 
in the country. Ski trips sponsored by the Ski Club add 
enthusiasm to this increasingly popular sport. 

The semester break saw many devotees of the sport 
flock to Aspen. Here, days are spent on the scenic slopes 
of Colorado and nights in the comfortable atmosphere 
of the Red Onion. 




'Now, how do you stop?" 



Ski Club trips take many Rangers to the slopes of Colorado. 




"Which end is the front?" 




145 




INTRAMURAL 



'Knights" and "Cowboys" fight it out 




FOOTBALL 



This years intramural football program proved to 
be one of the most successful ever held. The high in- 
terest shown by the players as well as the hotly contested 
play for the championship were especially noticeable. 
The defending champion Seven Mules were the early 
season favorites for the title, but the rest of the league 
had other plans. Once the season began the league was 
dominated by the Cowboys, Black Knights, Argos and 
ADG. 

The season ended with the Black Knights pitted 
against the Cowboys in the championship game. The 
Knights were led by Jim "Checkers" Crowley, Dick Bar- 
teau, and Vince Bocklage, while the freshman dominated 
Cowboys were led by the strong arm of Dick Waters 
and the rugged defensive play of Mike McCormick and 
Felix Alfieri. The Knights earned a shot at the title by 
overcoming a 7-0 half time deficit to defeat ADG 8-7. 
The Cowboys, led by the passing of Waters defeated the 
Argos 12-7 in the semi-finals to gain a position opposite 
the Knights. 

The championship game saw Jim Crowley run for 
one touchdown and pass to Dick Barteau for another as 
the Knights defeated the Cowboys 12-2. 



INTRA-MURAL FOOTBALL CHAMPS: Back row: Jim Crowley, Tom Malley, Bob 
Wheeler, Dan Coffey. Front row: Vince Bocklage, Jerry Theisen, Al Rossi, 
Dick Barteau. 



146 





"Checkers" demonstrates near-professional form attempting to snare a pass from Jerry Theisen. 



Black Knights Kelly, Malley, and Bardeau prepare to charge in championship game with Cowboys. 




147 




INTRAMURAL 

BASKETBALL 



The 1961 intramural basketball season was again 
characterized by the numerous thrills and keen com- 
petition which make it the perennial favorite sport 
among the students. Due to a late start, the season con- 
sisted of a double elimination tournament ending the 
eighth of March. Early tournament favorites were last 
year's champions, the 7-7's, the Argos, and a strong 
freshman team, the Cowboys. 

Led by Jerry Theisen, Tom Hit/.elberger, and Cably 
McMahon, the 7-7's earned a berth in the finals by being 
the only undefeated team in the league. Meanwhile, 
the Cowboys, the Vikings, and the Argos, with one de- 
teat each, were fighting it out to see who would meet 
the 7-7's in the championship game. Paced by high 
scoring Craig Hibbison, the Argos defeated the Vikings 
and the Cowboys to earn a slot in the finals. In the 
Vikings game, however, the Argos lost the services of 
their speedy guard, Bob Christensen, cutting their num- 
ber to only five players. 

The championship game was a well-played, high 
scoring contest with the outcome being decided by the 
overall team strength of the 7-7's. Leading at the half by 
three points, the Argos ran out of gas in the early 
minutes of the second half and the 7-7's won their second 
consecutive championship by a comfortable twelve 
points. 



Craig Hibbison goes high to get tip in 
intramural conflict. 



Lawler scores two for "Hawks" 





****•"•»« 



They went thata way! 




Mike Ewers shows determination displayed in all intramural contests. 



"Say Ah". 




149 



19 



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ACTIVITIES 


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FRESHMAN 



INITIATION 

This year, the largest freshman class in the history 
of Regis College warily greeted the new world of col- 
lege life. Bewildered and confused, the freshmen arrived 
on campus, seeking their new homes in O'Connell Hall. 
Once settled, they sought out their Big Brothers, and 
began three memorable weeks of ties, beanies, and 
name tags. 

After completing a seemingly endless number of 
tests and placement interviews, the new collegians had 
their first chance to relax and meet their classmates at 
the freshman picnic at Genessee Mountain. On their 
return the freshmen entered a whirl of mixers, car 
washes, and room cleanings, climaxed by the annual 
Frosh Frolic— their first night as free men. 

Largely responsible for the overwhelming success of 
the entire initiation program was the persistent work of 
the Freshman Initiation Committee, headed by Student 
Senate Director, Dan Otero. One of the highlights of 
the initiation was the annual hike to Loretto Heights, 
completed this year in record time. However, the fresh- 
men's finest hour came on Turnabout Day when, to the 
dismay of many upperclassmen, the freshman class 
proved its ability to operate as a unit. 



Now youse guys is here sepifically for an edookaton. 



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Freshman and their parents receive an initial taste of college life. 




152 





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Alright, who's the wise guy that tied all the shoe laces together. 



Here, here . . . Ducks don't talk like that! 



Now I want this floor clean enough to eat off of . . . because my boy, you're going to. 






I'd walk a mile for a Camel, but 



sat on their pin cushions. 





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And my shoes keep walking back to you. 



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Say, does S. J. really mean "Stale Jokes." 




FRESHMAN 



After a strenuous three week period of shoe- 
shining, car-washing, road-running, and general 
soul-searching (What am I doing here?), the big 
night finally arrived; initiation was over, and the 
fall social season was beginning. Ushered into 
the Lincoln Room of the Shirley-Savoy Hotel by 
the soothing strains of Dean Bushnell's Orches- 
tra, the freshmen were at last beginning their 
college life. 

The climax of the jubilant affair was the pre- 
sentation of freshmen awards and the announce- 
ment of the Freshman Sweetheart. The winners 
of the awards for Outstanding Freshman, Most 



And just what are my duties 




I think there's something fishy going on here. 
By the way, did I bring one of you? 





FROLIC 



Humorous Freshman, Most Spirited Freshman, 
and Glutton for Punishment are selected each 
year by the Big Brothers who carefully observe 
the freshmen while the freshmen more carefully 
observe the candidates they have nominated for 
Freshman Sweetheart. 

The award winners this year were Bert Lieb- 
man, Outstanding Freshman; Nick Zarlengo, 
Most Humorous Freshman; Joe McGowan, Most 
Spirited Freshman; and Jim Torcivia, Glutton for 
Punishment. Reigning over the Frolic was Fresh- 
man Sweetheart Dianne DeCourcy, a Loretto 
Heights coed, and her attendants Barbara 
Brandt, Joanne Dehner, and Pat Jurcy. 



as your "Pineapple Princess?" 





Look, can I help it if my feet keep falling asleep. 



Thank you! And now I think I'll crown an upperclassman with it. 




157 



FRESHMAN SWEETHEART 




Miss Dianne DeCoursey 



158 



1961 
SWEETHEART 
ATTENDANTS 



Miss Joanne Dehner 





Miss Barbara Brandt 
Miss Pat Jurcy 




159 




I still can't understand why they held the winter Olympics in 
California! 




Aren't you glad you use Dial soap? 

Ah! Diane, you're sitting on my tuti-fruiti again! 




HALLOWEEN 



Once each year, the students of Regis College 
are given the opportunity to step out of their shells 
and let down their hair. This golden opportunity is 
afforded them by the annual Alpha Delta Gamma 
Halloween Dance. The dance, held at the Grange 
Insurance Hall, colorfully displayed the active imag- 
inations and creative abilities of the Regis men and 
their dates who were decked out in costumes rang- 
ing from an elderly Chinese coolie to a lean and 
rather thirsty looking vampire. 

The judges, faced with the difficult task of select- 
ing only three winners from the more than two- 




"Have you ever wondered where they get the prizes tha 
Let's get out of here. 



160 




MASQUERADE 



hundred gaudily attired couples, chose Carl Sullivan 
and his date, disguised as Biblical lepers (circa 
Ben-Hur), as winners of the first prize. Taking 
second plize were Jerry Lowry and his date who 
masqueraded as a pair of colored pickaninnies. Third 
place honors were awarded to Paul Fairchild and 
his date who, garbed in the most elegant costumes 
of the evening, went as Cyrano de Bergerac and 
Roxanne. Jim Taylor, president of Alpha Delta 
Gamma, was Master of Ceremonies for the evening, 
and awarded the cash prizes to the winners. 



me in Cracker Jacks boxes?" 





"By the way, wha'd you do with that box of tranquilizers I gave 
you?" 





Hey Kingfish, how did Amos get his cab in here, 
'd tell him to go empty his own garbage! 




161 




'The order of the day is decorum . . . not dispatch!" 



FALL CONVOCATION 



The Most Reverend Charles Buswell reads the Gospel as dignitaries and students look on. 




162 




k iff | \m 

The Most Reverend Hubert Newell addresses the attending students 



The 1960 Fall Convocation marked the for- 
mal observance of the beginning of the 1960- 
1961 academic year. It thus renewed the com- 
mitment of the faculty and the student of Regis 
College to the intellectual life and the pursuit 
of truth and knowledge. 

After the Solemn High Mass of the Holy 
Ghost in which many of the most distinguished 
clergymen in America participated, these men 
addressed the academically gowned faculty and 
senior students of Regis as well as its under- 
graduates. The principle speech of the morning 
consisted of a very fine presentation by Rev- 
erend O'Neil al' Amour, the Associate Secretary 
of the National Catholic Educational Associa- 
tion. Duscussing the shortcoming of the educa- 
tional system in America, he pointed out many 
aspects of the educational philosophy and the 
goals of the colleges and universities in America 
in which he considered them to be deficient. 



The Reverend D'Amour criticizes the American educational 
system. 

IN FOREGROUND FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Most Reverends Charles Buswell, Hubert Newell, Bernard Sullivan, Urban J. Vehr, the Very Reverends Richard 
Ryan, O'Neil D'Amour, and Dr. Frank McGlone. 




X/ 



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After successfully scoffing up each other's shoes, partners arrange to kick each other in the shins. 



PRESENTATION BALL 



On November 21, a near capacity crowd wit- 
nessed the official presentation of the hopeful queen 
candidates to the student body of Regis College. The 
grand ballroom of the elegant Denver Hilton was 
selected by the host fraternity, Alpha Kappa Psi, as 
the setting for the gala event. Here the Regis men 
and their dates danced to the music of Glen Stock- 
ing and his orchestra. Something new, however, was 
added to the dance in the form of a favor which was 
distributed to all the girls attending the dance. 

The highlight of the ball was the actual presen- 
tation of the queen candidates to the enthusiastic- 
crowd by the various campus organizations. Miss 
Kei Hale, a dark haired, vivacious beauty, was pre- 
sented by Alpha Kappa Psi and escorted by Tom 
Tracy. Representing the Benchwarmers was a pretty 
and broadly smiling Miss Sheila Maun escorted by 
Dave Cullan. Carrying the familiar Irish Club ban- 



ner was charming Miss Beverly Tryon escorted by 
Charles Eby. Alpha Delta Gamma presented Miss 
Carol Scuderi, a cute, dark haired hopeful escorted 
by Tom Schneider; and the Raliah Club offered a 
very lively dark haired brunette Miss Janet Gaglia 
who was escorted by Fred Albi. All of these candi- 
dates with the exception of Kei Hale who is a coed 
at Colorado University, were from Loretto Heights 
College. 

Also attending the dance was Miss Linda Inman 
who watched as the candidates lined up on the stage 
one of whom would be her successor in only a few 
weeks at the Coronation Ball. 

Thus began a rigorous and costly campaign by 
each organization to place their candidate in the 
coveted position. Only at the coronation would they 
know to what extent their efforts and their candi- 
dates were accepted by the students of Regis. 



'No dear, that's not a giant tea bag!" 



think we're being watched." 





164 



|J 





'Yes, we have frogs where I come from . . . Why do you ask?" 



"Be sociable . . . have a Pepsi.' 




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Presenting: Miss Carol Scuderi, Miss Janet Gaglia, Miss Kei Hale, Miss Sheila Maun, and Miss Beverly Tryon. 



{"td 




Now you and your date stay on that side and my sister and I will stay on 
this side. 



Now heres the deal. 




i 




165 





'She says that the furniture has been repossessed, the mortgage is due, her husband lost his job, 

Feature production of the year by the Regis 
College Playhouse was Ketti Frings' adaptation of 
"Look Homeward, Angel," best-selling novel by 
Thomas Wolfe. Under the critical eye of their di- 
rector-moderator, the Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J., the 
dramatic group effectively displayed its top quality 
talent for the seventh consecutive year. 

The female lead roll was aptly handled by Miss 
Kathy Cuthbertson, in the finely shaded portrayal 
of the domineering mother, Eliza Gant. Laura 



LOOK 



HOMEWARD 



Please, Pop, it's going to be the biggest barn dance yet. 



ANGEL 



166 





but otherwise everything is fine.' 



James, played by Loretto's Kathy Robinson, added 
charm and innocence to the sober production. Mary 
Jo Catlett as Fatty, and Carol Conley as the bawdy, 
unrepentant harlot, Madame Elizabeth, delivered 
flawless characterizations. 

Strongly represented in the male cast was the 
Freshman class, offering such forceful actors as Paul 
McShane, Bill Souba, and Dan McNally. Dan's ex- 
cellent performance as the independent Ben Gant 
was the highlight of a most entertaining evening. 




Fr. Deeman issues instruction to actors and actresses. 



Gee! Why am I blamed for every sour note. 




167 



CORONATION 
BALL 






'C.W.C.!!!' 



"Loretto Heights"!!! 



Climaxing two weeks of extravagant campaign- 
ing by the clubs and fraternities for their lovely 
respective candidates, the brothers of Alpha Delta 
Gamma chose the Denver Hilton Hotel as the setting 
for the glamorous Coronation Ball. In the Grand 
Ballroom, the Begis men and their dates danced to 
the flowing music of Glen Stocking and his orchestra. 

All interest was focused on the special guests 
including lovely Miss Linda Inman, wearing her 
crown for the last time, and the lovely candidates 
of whom one was elected to replace her. These candi- 
dates included, Miss Kei Hale sponsored by Alpha 



Kappa Psi, Miss Shelia Maun of the Benchwarmers, 
Miss Janet Gaglia representing the Italian Club, 
Miss Carol Scuderi of Alpha Delta Gamma, and 
Miss Beverly Tryon sponsored by the Irish Begis 
Association. On December 7, at 10:30 a new queen 
was crowned when Miss Linda Inman relinquished 
her crown and her reign to the Alpha Delta Gamma 
candidate, blissful Queen Carol Scuderi, who as- 
sumed them as the crowd applauded with approval. 
Several hours later, the music ceased but will 
echo in memories for all who attended. 



Meanwhile two blocks away at the "Vitamin Festival. 



"Don't tell ME yoo didn't have a date with Rhoda Schwin last night! 






MISS CAROL SCUDERI 



170 




QUEEN OF REGIS 



Cute and personable is Miss Carol Scuderi 
chosen by Regis College for its 1960-1961 queen. 
Typifying this lovely blue eyed brunett is a 
readily evident friendly smile. Hailing from 
River Forest, Illinois, this Loretto Heights Junior 
has always held a sincere interest in the group of 
Regians that always surround her. 



Although holding active memberships in the 
Sodality, Benchwarmers, Student Senate, and 
Student Development Program, she still finds 
time for horseback riding, skiing, swimming, 
and skating, which readily identify her with the 
outdoors. It is truly a privilege to be able to call 
Carol Scuderi queen of Regis. 









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ATTENDANT 

MISS JANET GAGLIA 



Denver girl . . . striving for degree 
in Education . . . Italian Club candi- 
date . . . brown locks . . . terrific cook 
. . . auburn eyes . . . stands 5'6". 



ATTENDANT 



MISS kEI HALE 



C.U. coed . . . attractive ash blond 
. . . excels in art, skiing, and horseback 
riding . . . pert 5'7" . . . represented 
AKY . . . holds membership in Pi 
Beta Phi. 



172 




ATTENDANT 

MISS SHEILA MAUN 



Hails from St. Paul, Minnesota . . . 
tiny 5'2" . . . junior . . . titian hair . . . 
azure eyes . . . faithful to the Bench- 
warmers . . . fanatic snow and water 
skier. 





ATTENDANT 

MISS BEV TRYON 



Attends Loretto Heights . . . former 
cheerleader ... ski enthusiast . . . spon- 
sored by the IRA . . . English major 
. . . brown eyes and hair . . . junior. 



17:-; 




Fr. ChuiminaMo speaks of the "Two Worlds" and their 
implications. 

Students leave for the retreat site where food for thought is presented. 





Rev. Matthew Lynch S. J., emphasizes the need to lead virtuous lives 



STUDENT 



Coming hard upon the heels of an exhaustive exam 
week, the retreat provided Regis students with an op- 
portunity for a spiritual rejuvenation. Three days of 
clear, warm, and windy weather offered an excellent 
setting for thoughtful prayer and meditation. 

Father Chuiminatto S.J., the junior-senior retreat 
master, reminding his charges that their time at Regis 
was growing short, asked them to recall the final ac- 
counting of their talents. He emphasized that they 
should dust off and re-examine their ideals in a consid- 
eration of that accounting. 




174 




w 




always. 



RETREAT 



Father John Daly S.J. conducted the retreat for the 
sophomores and freshmen. Students were encouraged to 
discover what events in Christ's life might serve as par- 
ticularly pertinent examples for their own scholastic 
and moral lives. 

Conducting the closed retreat in Sedalia, Father 
Matthew Lynch, S.J., spoke of the need to live virtuous 
lives always, thus strengthening the moral character by 
overcoming moral weaknesses. Students returned to work 
with an increased awareness of their responsibilities as 
scholars, secondarily, and Catholic scholars, primarily. 






Fr. John Daly speaks of the need to follow Christ's 
example. 




175 



POLITICS 



Early in October, the Sophomore, Junior, 
and Senior classes were faced with the laborious 
task of electing the various members of the 
General Assembly. Several weeks later, the 
Freshmen were faced with the same task, thus 
completing the entire slate of class officers. 

Along about November, posters once again 
adorned the halls as the various campus organi- 
zations initiated one of the most extravagant and 
elaborate campaigns of the year. The campaign 
began with the Presentation Ball and reached 
the finale at the Coronation Ball. 

The first month of the second semester saw 
the Executive Board elections as the prominent 
item on the political scale. Following was two 
weeks of campaigning in which a jazz session, 
initialed matchbooks, free cigarettes, napkins, 
table tents, place mats, field house schedules, 
and other campaign literature litered the cam- 
pus, was climaxed by a public debate by the op- 
posing parties. The Inaugural Ball witnessed 
the exchange of powers. 



Queen candidates brighten the walls of the usually drab hallway. 




Mike Roblee is found emerging from a shower. 





Candidates Dave Cullan and Don McNeil having a casual discussion with Paul Horan, outgoing president. 





A student takes time out to study 
candidate qualifications. 



After patiently waiting, students receive their tickets to the Inaugural Ball before voting. 



Photograph are not always the most eyecatching political instrument. 





1961 

INAUGURAL 
BALL 



The old and the new members of the Student 
Executive Board exchanged both power and 
congratulations at the first annual Inaugural Ball. 

Both ballrooms of the Shirley-Savoy Hotel 
were filled with Begis men and their dates as 
they danced to the music of the Chuck Bennet 
Orchestra. In the main ballroom, a huge back- 
it's at times like this that a sensation of loneliness creeps over you. 







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The old executive board takes a back seat to the new. 



drop contributed very effectively to the theme 
of the dance which was the first inauguration 
of a president of the United States. The other 
ballroom saw the couples entertained by the 
very brisk music of a combo. 

Being such a success, it is hoped that it will 
become an annual affair. 



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Webster couldn't have defined a dance any better. 



Now you didn't really expect her to wear that did you? 



How long does it take a girl to get two Cokes. 





RANGER DAY 



Except for graduation exercises, Ranger Day is 
the most anticipated event on the Regis calendar. 
Because of the friendly and casual atmosphere, the 
day has always been a tremendous success, and this 
year was no exception. 

The fun began when ace Bill Belford pitched the 
students to a blazing victory over the faculty in the 
annual Softball game. This game was followed by a 
hilarious grudge match between Loretto Heights 
and Colorado Woman's College during which both 
sides tried to exhibit their mechanical superiority 
over the other. Happily, the match ended in a tie. 
Then came the somewhat disastrous bicycle race. 
Each organization on campus attempted to show it's 
athletic prowess through the merits of its bicycle 
rider. Because of the various mishaps, the official 
results were not made known. Some of the riders 
gave vent to their disappointment by smashing a 
car into small pieces. 

The car-wrecking was followed by the greased 
pig contest and the push ball game. After these 
meager displays of talent, the crowd drifted over to 
the student center for a real talent show which was 
highlighted by some rather skilful impersonations of 
several well-known faculty members. 

The talent show was followed bv a chicken dinner 
on the campus lawn and Benediction in the Student 
Chapel. The crowd then returned to the Student 
Center for a jam session featuring the Queen City 
Dixieland Jazz Band from the Mon-Vue Village. 
After the applause died down, Dean Bushnell pro- 
vided some quieter dance music. 

The day was termed a success bv all, but those 
who felt most proud were those who worked so hard 
to make it so. 







« j. . !<■ ,.., i i : Pi il •![.'*» 



x- -1M 





Maybe they keep the spare tire, whatever that is, in the motor 



Yea, and then we turned up Mozart so loud that he blew out all the windows. 





It missed the bat and missed the glove, but it didn't 



«*"• 




compartment, wherever that is. 



I 





---'*--- _ ■■ ■-.- 




I hear you knockin, but you can't come in. 



m . V,. m 





Six good reasons why Regis needs a hospital!! 



Honor is paid to our most important guest. 




Familiar Expressions: 



"See me in my office." 

"The second mail isn't in yet." 

"What floor have you got?" 

"Can I boiTOw a cigarette?" 

"Got a light?" 

"Do you want me to smoke it for you too?" 

"Who's the editor of the yearbook this week?" 

"But she really has a tough personality!" 

"I'll pay you back as soon as " 

"Now be sure and get me up!" 

"What's for dinner?" 

"Scrambled eggs again, huh!" 

"Just a minute it's got to be here somewhere." 

"How many you got in your car?" 

"Fix me up!" 

"No mail again!" 

"What were some of the questions?" 

"Hey, do you have a stamp I can borrow?" 

"Have you got an extra razor?" 

"Where's your newspaper?" 

"As soon as I copy it, I'll bring it back." 

"No, but I've got a five pennies for a dime!" 

"Will you turn it down a little." 

"Any laundry this week?" 

"But father, I don't think you understand." 

"Are the other ones out of milk, too!" 

"You don't happen to have a couple of extra hangers?" 

"NO! No stuffing." 

"What's the deal!" 

"Hey how'd that letter get into my soup?" 

"Pst. What's number 27?" 

"No! One with pickles, no mustard and onions, one with no pickles 

"Campused again!" 



Familiar Impressions 

the towel dispenser completely void of towels. 

the 8:15 class that you woke up for at 8:30. 

the quarter you had that you could not find change for. 

the cigarettee you had, but no match. 

the search for a cigarette butt in your ashtray long enough to smoke. 

the trench coat that was lent out and came back stained. 

the date you had but no ride. 

the only pen you had that ran out of ink during a test. 

the notebook you hadn't located 2 minutes before class. 

the busy signal you get after dialing WE4- 

the full check book you had with no money to back it. 

the pizza stain on your term paper. 

the times you remembered to check out when in Boulder. 

the excuses you invented in order to stay in bed in the morning. 

the first letter from home after grades were out. 

the term paper you finished 5 minutes before the deadline. 

the five minute bull session ending two hours later. 

the teacher that arrived 9 minutes after the bell had rung. 

the sharp blind date you got that didn't fit the description. 

the scribbled note you couldn't unscramble. 

the clanking pipes when the heat was turned on. 

the wait for that hot shower. 

the times you dodged the paper boy on collection day. 

the empty mail slot. 

the struggle to stay awake for your 8:15 class. 

the night before cramming for tests and then sleeping through the test. 

the fourth cut that you thought was your third. 

the dinner rolls that somehow always wound up in the gravy. 

the few, little chalk marks the teacher missed when erasing the board. 

the times that you experienced the power of a shaving cream bomb. 

the motley crew you saw wandering in for breakfast in the morning. 

the feeling of restlessness that apprehends you 20 min. before class ends. 



182 




THE ESSENCE OF REGIS 



It might be said that it's tough, and it's not exactly the ritz, but it's Regis . . . and we like it. 



Xf'f& 






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I * **<& 




^Pitili it in 



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'1 





. . intellectual, 



The life of the Regis man can be thought 
of as a search for . . . 



spiritual, 








-**i*mK 




. . . and social development. 



184 



During his four years at Regis 
this search poses many difficult 
problems which often lead to . . . 



. . bewilderment, 




frustration, 






A " "f; <'t,'f""'' .\\ '.."■ 



and achievement. 



185 




To foster this search, the 
college offers a curriculum 
designed to develop . . . 



... a knowledge of human 
nature through courses in 
literature, 



... an appreciation of 
ultimate religious values 
through courses in Theology 




186 




... an attitude of social 
and civic responsibility 
through courses in the 
social sciences, 




a knowledge of the past through courses in History, 




logical reasoning through courses in philosophy, 



. . . precise thinking 
through courses in the 
natural sciences, 




and accurate deducting through courses in mathematics, 





And the answers which he so diligently seeks are 
found through . . . 



. . solitary study, 



. consultation. 




instruction. 




188 




. . observation, 



meditation, 




. . illustration. 





*3I 



and experimentation. 



189 



But students are not always found 
delving through books and notes, as 
time is also found for . . . 




190 




And at times their search is 
diverted to . . . 



seclusion, 



<M$ 




- ■ 



peace, 



~H^ /gfe . 





.".;'.. 










serenity, 



and quieter surroundings. 




191 



When there are multitudes, there is found, 
as there will be, some dissatisfaction . . . 





. . . cramped closet space, 



. . . the lack of a suitable study 
place, 





... an interruption of privacy, 




maintaining resolutions, 




flickering, foggy, viewing, 




; 



E RETURN 



. . . unheeded pleas, 



the size of the rooms, 



and underestimated efforts 





These dissatisfactions are, for the most 
part, overcome as the students patiently 
await . . . 



the next move, 










. the last ball to be sunk, 



. . . letters from home, 








194 





free games to dwindle, 



their turn for snacks, 




. . . mealtime, 




. . and finally graduation. 




&*&** 



*■& "3* 




Regis men find spare time a wel- 
come opportunity to channel their 
interests in many directions . . . 

... by way of letters, 




mountain outings, 



196 





conquering the slopes, 



. . . attempting a big splash, 









exercising futile control, 



. . . traversing the vast, 



accomplishing some extra reading, 





or maybe even in thought. 




197 




. . . informal dancing, 



And the weekend finds their attention 
diverted to many and varied social 
activities . . . 




. . . everyday conversation. 



putting on the dog, 



playing a game in spirit. 







relaxing in a suitable atmosphere, 



endeavoring to converse simultaneously, 



engrossed in quiet discussion, 





. . . and uselessly attempting to harmonize. 




His years at Regis can be thought of as a 
way of life in which . . . 



new paths are made, 




. . . there is resemblance of other colleges, 





. . . advice is never lacking, 



ingenuity overcomes deficiency, 





humor is always evident, 




. . . obstacles are overcome, 



friends are made, 



. . . but, for some, paths must separate. 






This year marked, among the 
traditional social events, some- 
thing new . . . 



'The Four Freshmen,' 



and, something unusual. 




202 




a familiar sight, 



But in the end, it's the old standbys, which 
can never be replaced . . . 



a familiar night, 




. . that will linger only in memory. 





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wm> 




AWARDS 



ACADEMIC CONVOCATION 




Fr. Hoewicher addresses the students on the Importance of a liberal education. 



New to the college this year was the Academic 
Convocation which provided the students an op- 
portunity to recognize the outstanding academic 
achievements of their fellow students. 

Following the processional and invocation, Fr. 
Hoewisher, dean of students, addressed the stu- 
dent body on the importance of a liberal education. 
He stated that the college seeks to develop the 
intellects of the students bv instilling the impetus 
for searching truth. 

Delivering the Convocation address, Dr. Ches- 
ter M. Alter, Chancellor of Denver University spoke 
of the educational system as an institution that 
weaves into the very fabric of man those truths 
which have always been the very fibers so essential 
for an active participation in a rich full life. In 
conclusion, he stated that education loses a valuable 
dimension if it loses the basic elements of religion 
which have always been of basic importance to man. 

The convocation terminated with the distribution 
of awards and finally the recessional. 



Processional Marshal, Rev. Edward Maginnis, S.J., leads the graduation 
class to the convocation. 







206 





THEODORE BARTH 



ROBERT PIPKIN 



PRESIDENTS SCHOLARS 




TERRENCE KELLY 




CHARLES RAMUNNO 



207 




RHO CHI SIGMA AWARD 



ROBERT PIPKIN 



KENNETH JOULE 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI AWARD 



RONALD DISTEL 





BIOLOGY AWARD 



208 



DEBATE AWARD 




r 



FRESHMAN CHEMISTRY AWARD 

SR. ELAINE ARBUTHNOT, O.S.F. 




PAl L HORAN 



DENNIS GALLAGHER 




DEBATE AWARD 




209 



HONORS BANQUET 



This year, the outstanding extracurricular 
achievements of individuals and organizations on 
the campus were recognized at a banquet pre- 
sided over by Paul Horan, past president of the 
student body. 

Acknowledgment of the preceeding executive 
board began the festivities. Special guest, Regis 
alumnus, Benedict Cosmi then proceeded to 
award the various awards to the deserving 
recipients. 

One of the highlights of the evening was a 
magnificiently delivered speech by Mr. Thomas 
Tierney who stressed the importance of individ- 
ual endeavors into the various phases of life. He 
asked the students to recall the fact that this 
country was founded by men who recognized the 
significance of individual responsibility. 

The banquet provided an apportunity for the 
students to review the contributions made to the 
school and its members by those who well de- 
served the recognition. 




A treat for the students was the exquisitely prepared and served meal. 



Alumnus Benedict Cosmi presented many awards to his one 
time schoolmates in a memorable night. 



210 





The brother of Alpha Kappa Psi appear delighted at acquiring the coveted award. 



OUTSTANDING ORGANIZATION 



LEFT TO RIGHT: Robert Pipkin, chairman of the Honors Banquet, John Foley, president of A.K.Y., 
and special guest, Benedict Cosmi. 



ALPHA 
KAPPA 
PSI 




211 





LEFT TO RIGHT: Dennis Gallagher, Christ O'Donnel, Jim Yax, Paul Dugan, Dan O'tero, Tom Murnan, Ken Joule, Robert Pipkin, James Taylor, Jim Waters, 
John Foley. 



WHO'S WHO 

FRANK BLATTER JOSEPH BURR 





FRANK BLATTER, a resident of Den- 
ver, Colorado and an active sportsman and 
scholar. As a member of the "R" Club, and 
the basketball and baseball teams, Frank 
has consistently appeared on the Dean's List. 



JOSEPH BUHR, an Accounting major, 
comes from Raton, New Mexico. In his 
senior year, he was recipient of the Joseph G. 
Ryan Memorial Award. Joe has appeared 
on the Dean's List and is a staff member 
of the Brown and Gold. 



212 



ANTHONY DURSEY 





PAUL DUGAN 



ANTHONY DURSEY, a resident of Den- 
ver, Colorado, is an Accounting major. In 
his freshman year he was the winner of the 
Ryan Accounting Award. Anthony has fre- 
quently appeared on the Dean's List. 



PAUL DUGAN, a major in Business Ad- 
ministration, hails from Wichita, Kansas. 
Paul has filled an important office at Regis 
—that of Student Senate Director. He is an 
active and efficient leader besides being a 
hall prefect. He was also named a Regis 
"Man of the Year." 



JOHN FOLEY 





DENNIS 
GALLAGHER 



DENNIS GALLAGHER, an Irishman 
responsible for the Irish Regis Association, 
is a resident of Denver, Colorado and a 
Regis "Man of the Year." He also holds ac- 
tive membership in the Sodality, the Literary 
Club, the Denver Club, and the Regis 
College Playhouse. 



JOHN FOLEY, active in student govern- 
ment, and a major in Philosophy, is past 
president of the Junior class and Alpha 
Kappa Psi. John is a member of the Sodality, 
the Ranger staff, the Brown and Golf staff, 
and the Literary Club. He is also a Regis 
"Man of the Year." 



jn 



■ 




KENNETH JOULE 



KENNETH JOULE, former editor-in- 
chief of the Brown and Gold, is a major in 
Business Administration from Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. Ken was treasurer of the Stu- 
dent Senate and his Sophomore class Presi- 
dent. He is also a member of the Sodality. 



tiiomas \u rnan 



THOMAS MURNAN, a capable leader 
in academic and extracurricular activities, is 
a life-long resident of Denver, Colorado. 
Tom has consistantly attained the honor of 
being named for the Dean's List. 





dimSTOI'HEK ODONfSEI 



CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL, a resi- 
dent of Detroit, Michigan, was secretary of 
the Student Senate and Vice-president of his 
Sophomore and Junior classes. Besides being 
on the Dean's List, Chris engages in activi- 
ties with the Ranger, the Brown and Gold, 
KREG, and Alpha Kappa Psi business 
fraternity. 



DANIEL OTERO 



DANIEL OTERO, a member of Rho Chi 
Sigma and a resident of Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, is noted for the organization of the 
Freshman Initiation Activities. Dan also 
served as a Student Senate Director, and as 
a member of the Brown and Gold Staff 
and KREG Radio Station. 



214 




ROBERT PIPKIN 



ROBERT PIPKIN, a resident of Denver, 
Colorado, is a genuine scholar. He has ap- 
peared on the Dean's List all eight semesters 
and was Vice-president of the Student Sen- 
ate. Bob holds active membership in Rho 
Chi Sigma, the Denver Club, and the 
Aquinas Academy, and has received the 
President's Scholar Award. 





JAMES TAYLOR 



JAMES TAYLOR, a resident of Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, is a business major. Jim 
has contributed his time and energy to all 
the organizations of which he belongs which 
include: the Sodality, the Brown and Gold, 
the Ranger, KREG, the IRA, the Ski Club 
and the Benchwarmers. 



JAMES WATERS 



JAMES WATERS, editor-in-chief of the 
Brown and Gold, is a resident of Kansas 
City, Missouri. Besides being named as a 
Regis "Man of the Year," Jim is also a mem- 
ber of the Saint John Berchman's Society, 
the Aquinas Academy, KREG, the Ski Club, 
the Tennis Club, and Rho Chi Sigma. 





JAMES YAX 



JAMES YAX, a resident of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, is a member of the Dean's List. 
Besides being a winner of the Theology 
Award, Jim is a member of Rho Chi Sigma 
fraternity, the Aquinas Academy and the 
Regis College Debate Society. 



215 




KENNETH WILLIAMS 



GLEASON 
SPORTS 



AWARD 



216 




JAMES (ROWLEY 



SCHOOL SPIRIT AWARD 

FREDERIC REICHERT 





GERALD THELSEN 



INTRAMURAL AWARDS 




217 



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REV. GEORGE TIPTON S.J 
FACULTY AWARD 



IRISH CLUB 
CATHOLIC CHARITIES AWARD 



ST. THOMAS MORE AWARD 



DEBATE HONORS 





THOMAS SCAGLIA 



218 




OUTSTANDING 



FRESHMAN 
AWARDS 



BERT LIEHMA1NN 



MOST SPIRITED 





JOE McGOWAN 



MOST HUMOROUS 



JIM TORCIVIA 



GLUTTON FOR PUNISHMENT 




MCK ZARLENGO 



219 





JOHN FOLEY 




PAUL DUGAN 



REGIS MEN 



CHRISTOPHER O'DONNEL 



DAMAL OTERO 








220 




DENNIS GALLAGHER 



OF THE YEAR 




PAUL HORAN 



A! Mi \ 




KENNETH JOULE 



ROBERT PIPKIN 



JAMES WATERS 





221 






'3F • '•■ 



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set 



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ADVERTISING 



jO* 14 ™ A "C/ S 




**. 



V 1 



Compliments of 
Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Walgreen & Family 



224 



afcjjfe. 




From the Brothers of ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

Gamma Sigma Chapter. 



225 



Qo4uyixUulcduiMA 



REGIS COLLEGE GRADUATES 



Class of '61 





Wonderful Continental 
Food and Beverages 

Banquet-Party 
Meeting Rooms 

Valley Highway at Speer 
Denver, Colorado 




In all of Denver 
Nothing can compare 

Country Club 

Atmosphere with 

Downtown 

Convenience 




226 




PHONE 
GRand 7-4170 



MEMBER 




NATD 



|[ R and C WHOLESALE CO. 

CANDY — GUM — CIGARETTES — TOBACCO — SUNDRIES 
3616 TEJON STREET DENVER 11, COLORADO 



/ 7 



:<■ 






/ / 




Compliments 

of 

LORETTO 

HEIGHTS 

COLLEGE 



227 



nxufoluj, welcomed . . . 

TIFFIN INN 

1730 So. Colorado Blvd. Denver, Colorado • Skyline 6-831 1 

§ DINING ROOM 




COFFEE HOUSE 



GOLD SCREEN LOUNGE 

IN LUXURIOUS WRITERS' MANOR <>*" 

-T ■--•, .■■■■-'?-■■■■: S"V"-\ :v-'I"-\ ,:•■-" O 



^^ GA ^//V 




%/G D^' 







S-" ; 



emttu 



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■«!.- ^^ ^ss> 



MERKL'S SERVICE 
STATION 

4437 West 38th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 
GLendale 5-3190 



Compliments 

of 

MR. AND MRS. AL C. GOTTSCHALK 

GARDEN CITY, KANSAS 



228 



& 



-/;>;■■■'-':■ 



..;■■;-:■-■■'/■■■ -vr ■'"■':■'■■' 'W'- 

'■'■■■:■-■'■", . ■■■-.■:■ .:.-■■-/; 




Congratulations to 
THE CLASS OF 1960 

GRIFFITH MOTORS, II. 

2770 North Speer Boulevard 
Denver 11, Colorado GRand 7-3313 



LUETHY'S KITCHEN 

5004 N. Federal Blvd. 

Good Food Pleasant Atmosphere 

Home Made Pies & Pastry 
Open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Closed Sunday 



Compliments of 

PARK HILL MOTOR HOTEL 



'The Aristocrat Motel' 



3975 Colorado Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 



Reasonable 
Rates 



Phone DExter 3-4246 



50 Modern Units 



Compliments 
of 

VESCOVO BUILDING AND REALTY COMPANY 

9620 Gravois Road 
St. Louis 23, Missouri 



229 



w. ^Rii/ 


SENIOR DIRECTORY 


J$Ljt«%Df< LANES 


DON J. ALBERT 

4560 King Street 
Denver, Colorado 


^-^ J l^s p~W<-v* w^"* ■■ ■» *^ ■■ ^# 


RUSSEL and BABE JONES 


5225 Wadsworth Avenue 
ARVADA, COLORADO 

HArrison 4-8121 


JOHN T. ALENIUS 
350 Cook 
Denver, Colorado 


Reservations for week ends 


RAFAEL J. ALMADA 
Hidalgo No. 103, Novojos 
Sonora, Mexico 

VINCENT J. ARCHER 

7080 Larsh Drive 
Denver, Colorado 


Open Daily 10 a.m. til Midnight 
Sundays and Holidays 8 a.m. til Midnight 


BEER DEPOT 


RICHARD J. BARTEAU 

110 S. Quitman 
Denver, Colorado 


3.2 BEER 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Davis 


MORRIS G. BEDDOES 

322 E. Welshire 
Fullerton, California 




WILLIAM A. BEDFORD 


Ge. 3-4902 4231 W. 38th Ave. at Stuart 


Route 1 

Beggs, Oklahoma 

GEORGE A. BEUTNER 
815 E. 18th Street 
Denver, Colorado 


Compliments 


of 

LINDAHL'S PHOTO SALES 

1637 Court Place 
Denver, Colorado 


LAWRENCE C. BLACKFORD 

905 Olive Street 
Denver, Colorado 

FRANK E. BLATTER 
4663 Meade 
Denver, Colorado 

DONALD H. BOECHMAN 
7475 Julian 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE R. BOERSIG 
1650 Lewis Street 
Denver, Colorado 


"BLUE PARROT CAFE" 


Best Italian Food 


MAURICE J. BOERSIG 
1650 Lewis Street 
Denver, Colorado 




MICHAEL R. BOIAN 
728 S. Gilpin 
Denver, Colorado 


Mike Colecci For Res. Call CA 6-9090 
Prop. Louisville, Colo. 


THOMAS F. BRENNAN 

1614 Lilac Drive 

South St. Louis Park, Minnesota ' 



230 



JAY K. BUCKLEY, JR. 

5565 Federal 
Denver, Colorado 



JOE D. BUHR 
416 Aliso Drive, N.E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



BRIAN C. BURNS 
1950 Simms 
Denver, Colorado 



JAMES T. CLARK 
418 N.Yale 
Wichita, Kansas 



EDWARD L. CLINTON 
4194 Hooker 
Denver, Colorado 



ROBERT J. CONNOLLY 
263 S. Washington 
Denver, Colorado 



THOMAS E. DENNY 
1 266 Lafayette Street 
Denver, Colorado 



ROBERT R. DIETZ 
2514 N. 65th Street 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 

RONALD A. DISTEL 
936 Greene 
Silverton, Colorado 



PAUL V. DUGAN 
R.F.D. No. 8 
Wichita, Kansas 

JOHN B. FOLEY 
69 Mission Rd. 
Wichita, Kansas 



GEORGE P. FOURET 

608 Chestnut Street 
Trinidad, Colorado 



DENNIS J. GALLAGHER 
4269 Quitman 
Denver, Colorado 



JAMES P. GODFREY 
1632 S. Quincy 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 



THE ESKIMO SKI SHOP 

"for the finest in clothing 
and equipment" 

traditionally patronized by 
Regis and Loretto 



416 E. 7th Ave. 



Al. 5-2474 



Compliments 
of 



moP' eJu jacks 



Shop 



Barber Shop 



'for a really good haircut' 



GERRY BREEN 

Florists 



1004 15th Street 



Ma. 3-2279 



Compliments 

of 

FRED L. ANDREWS 



231 



SAM'S 
Radio & Phonograph 

Specialist In 
Hi-Fi ir Stereo 

4974 Lowell Blvd. 
GL. 5-0744 



Compliments 
of 

NORTH DENVER DRUG 

5070 Federal Blvd. 

Serving North Denver Since 1924 
Fountain Service 



Gl. 5-6139 



Gl. 5-9850 



CARL'S BARBER SHOP 

3553 W. 44th Ave. 

"I need your head for me business" 

Your patronage will be appreciated 

Hours: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday 

CARL E. "COTTON" HARTMANN 
Manager 



TURNPIKE LIQUORS 



5445 Federal Blvd. 
GE. 3-1234 



JIM C. GOTTSCHALK 
807 N. Main 
Garden City, Kansas 



CHARLES A. GRAND 
3355 E. Montana Place 
Denver, Colorado 



ARTHUR W. GRANT 
925 Penn Ave. 
Boulder, Colorado 



JOHN R. HAMILTON, JR. 
1331 Bellair Street 
Denver, Colorado 



RICHARD B. HEIL 
1019 Hampton Park Drive 
St. Louis, Missouri 



EDDIE HERRERA 
3031 W. 19th Street 
Denver, Colorado 

CRAIG A. HIBBISON 
747 Forest Street 
Denver, Colorado 

TOM F. HITZELBERGER 
3353 N. Newland 
Chicago, Illinois 



R. PAUL HORAN 

340 Jersey Street 
Denver, Colorado 



WILLIAM B. HOUSTON 
6901 N. 12th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEANDRO R. JARAMILLO 
5341 E. 65th Ave. 
Derby, Colorado 

CLYDE D. JOHNSON 
1 124 East 1st Street, South 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

KENNETH R. JOULE 
2100 W. 30th Street 
Denver, Colorado 



RAYMOND G. KING 
1608 Steele 
Laramie, Wyoming 



232 



JOHN H. KOSEDNAR 
8503 W. Orchard 
West Allis, Wisconsin 



LOUIS J. KOSEDNAR, JR. 

8503 W. Orchard 
West Allis, Wisconsin 



PATRICK W. KOSMICKI 
1045 Duncan 
Alliance, Nebraska 



THOMAS C. LANDAUER 
5130 E. 17th Street 
Denver, Colorado 



TERRY K. LANOUE 
1945 S. 13th Street 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

ROBERT A. LENNON 
3405 Nebraska 
Sioux City, Iowa 

THOMAS A. LINNEBUR 
1878 E. Stratford 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

GERALD P. LONG 

3110 W. 40th Street 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE LUCHETTA 

3400 W. 18th Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 



JOHN E. LYONS 
6 River Road 
Calais, Maine 



CHARLES B. MCCORMICK, JR. 
265 Albion 
Denver, Colorado 



JOHN L. MCCOY 
610 E. Glencoe 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



MICHAEL J. MCCULLOUGH 

978 Steele 
Denver, Colorado 



DONALD E. MCKNIGHT 
3235 W. Conejos 
Denver, Colorado 



EASTWAY INN 

BOB COBURN, Your Host 

Beer To Go Every Day 

Including Sundays 

Dancing Nightly 

Phone SP. 7-9879 

1128 East 6th Ave. 

Denver 18, Colorado 




AUTO ACCESSORIES WASHING LUBRICATION 
PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 



ASHKER'S 



4890 Lowell Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 



Joseph R. Ashker 
Prop. 



SERVICE 



GL. 5-7529 



'Phillip 




*«. 



233 



Dress Properly 
For Special Affairs 

WE RENT DRESS SUITS 

for 

PROMS WEDDINGS 

FORMAL EVENTS 

Complete Line of Accessories 

C. B. GILLILAND g. CO. 

Formal Wear — Sales, Rentals 

1029 17th St. KE 4-3585 

Denver, Colorado 




-H'J^>' r l^ ? W^ 




LOWELL DRUGS 

ROY & MAXINE CAIN 
4901 Lowell Blvd. 



PETER J. MCLAUGHLIN 
4535 Mountview 
Denver, Colorado 



JOSEPH F. MARKEY 

3213 Bannock 
Denver, Colorado 



LAWRENCE W. MARRIN 

Box 242 

Dalton, Nebraska 



JAMES F. MASCHINOT 
1207 York 
Denver, Colorado 



MICHAEL F. MAYER 
829 W. 55th Street 
Kansas City, Missouri 

GEORGE S. MILLER 

8 Burr Place 

Palisades Park, New Jersey 

THOMAS F. MORGAN 
993 S. Emerson 
Denver, Colorado 

W. THOMAS MURNAN 
4417 Julian Street 
Denver, Colorado 



DENNIS L. NORTON 
2265 S. Jackson 
Denver, Colorado 



CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL 
761 1 LaSalle Blvd. 
Detroit, Michigan 



OWEN P. O'MEARA 
630 Vine Street 
Denver, Colorado 



PETE J. O'NEAL 
7167 Washington 
St. Louis, Missouri 



PATRICK H. O'NEILL 

1815 Eleanor 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



BRUCE W. PIPER 
4545 Vrain Street 
Denver, Colorado 



234 



ROBERT D. PIPKIN 
2570 Bellaire 
Denver, Colorado 



WILLIAM J. QUINN 

311 W. 4th Street 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 



JAMES L RAUEN 

7236 1st Avenue 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 



MARK E. REINECKE 

1595 Hanover 
Aurora, Colorado 



THOMAS J. REMINGTON 

2544 Balboa 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



MICHAEL J. ROBLEE 
351 N. 50th Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



JOHN F. RODGERS 

4689 Quitman Street 
Denver, Colorado 



CHARLES J. RAITZ 

915 State Street 
Trinidad, Colorado 



CHARLES J. ROMERO 
3136 W. 23rd Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 



JOSEPH G. RYAN, JR. 
224 S. Corona Street 
Denver, Colorado 



THOMAS N. SCAGLIA 
3558 Navajo 
Denver, Colorado 



THOMAS F. SCHNEIDER 

659 N. 77th Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



RALPH SCHWARTZ 
Hartington, Nebraska 



JOHN W. SCOTT 
4550 Galapago 
Denver, Colorado 



A & J DRIVE INN 

Place Your Order By Phone 

GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN & SHRIMP 
BURGERS— MALTS— FOOTLONGS 



1996 S. Federal Blvd. 



WEst 4-8494 



Where service tells 

DICK LOWE 

Watch Repair 



328 University Bldg. 
16th and Champa 



JACK AND TEENY'S 
BAR AND GRILL 

Best in Food and Drink 
Free Popcorn 

Known as 

"Sunnyside" 

4407 West 52nd Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 



Ski specialists in Denver 
for 22 years 

SKIS, BOOTS, 
SKI CLOTHES 



V 



SWISS CHALET 

1344 Broadway, Ke. 4-6632 

Ski and Ice Skate Rentals 

Open Mon. & Fri. Evenings during 

ski season 



235 



The 



SAGA 



Way 



"SLIMS" 

Hill Top Tavern 

Beer • Wine • Mixed Drinks 



4907 Lowell Blvd. 
1 block from school 



GEnesse 3-6381 



4030 Tennyson 



CENTER PHARMACY 



free delivery 



North Denver's Finest Prescription Dept. 



Les La key 



Bob Sumner 



CARLS PIZZA 



'Where the Regis Crowd 
Gathers" 



3812 W. 38th Ave. 



DENNIS E. STARBUCK 
27 S. 10th Ave. 
Brighton, Colorado 



JAMES B. STEIN 
3807 E. English 
Wichita, Kansas 



THOMAS B. STEWART 

Box 13, HG MAAG (DCSOMP) APO 63 

San Francisco, California 



PHILIP L SULLIVAN 
R.R. No. 4 
Stockton, Illinois 



C. C. SYNOGROUND 

2905 W. 2nd 
Denver, Colorado 



JOSEPH A. TARABINO 
Box 777 
Trinidad, Colorado 



JAMES B. TAYLOR 
5750 Kent 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



GERALD B. THEISEN 
Route 1, Box 116 
Sugar Grove, Illinois 



THOMAS J. TRACY 

180 Provencal Road 

Grosse Point Farms, Michigan 



ROBERT E. VESCOVO 
5 Huntleigh Woods 
St. Louis, Missouri 



JAMES J. WATERS 
802 West 61st 
Kansas City, Missouri 



MICHAEL V. WELLS 
136 Valley Drive 
Fairview, New Mexico 



A. KENTON WILLIAMS 
1039V2 Bridge Road 
Charleston, West Virginia 



JAMES F. YAX 
3145 S. 31st Street 
Lincoln, Nebraska 



236 




Compliments of 

COUGHLIN & COMPANY 

SECURITY BUILDING DENVER, COLORADO 



Compliments 
of 

Governor and 
Mrs. McNichols and Family 



1 STYLES FOR MEN 


m 

R 


O 

L 


r 

p 


r 

E 


• 

R 


S 

T 


PLAYBOY 



Denver's only 
Playboy store 

16th at Glenarm Sts. 




In Denver 



^CC&Cf't 



LAKESIDE 
CAFETERIA 



237 



Excellent 
Design 

Skilled 
Craftmenship 

Finest 
Quality 




EJEWELRY, INC 

ESTABLISHED 1924 



Diamonds 

Watches 

Silverware 

Jewelry 



Third Floor, University Bldg. 

910 16th Street - Ke. 4-6336 

Denver 2, Colorado 



ROBE R.T WILSON 
AND COMPANY 



. . . the store for every man, college 
or career bound, featuring the 
finest names in mens wear, 
furnishings and gifts. Convenient 
charge facilities to suit every budget. 



• 1626 California 

• University Hills 

• Cherry Creek 




Real Italian Dinners 
Mixed Drinks 



GAETANO'S 

EXCELLENT! CUSINA 

FINE FOOD 



3760 Tejon St. 

Gl 5-9852 
Denver, Colo. 



For travel to any place 
in the world call or write 



*pcd6e% - Sneiidcut 




517 17th St. MA. 3-1211 

Denver 2, Colo. 



238 



The 


Compliments 


SANDS 


of 


Club Members Accepted 


Mr. Jack McLaughlin 




of 




COTTRELL'S 


1523 Glenarm PI. CH. 4-9730 


601 16th Street Denver, Colo. 


KORN'S 


Compliments 
of 


Men's Shop 


Oft Al 


"Specializing in clothing and 


AlA A .A A A— / ^m 


sports wear for young men" 


*pp§xpsx§x§i 


412 16th Street 
Denver, Colorado 


Am. 6-1754 416 15th Street 
Red Stamps 


Good Luck 


Glendale 5-7623 


to the 
1961 Grads 

"BOOTS" 
TEXACO SERVICE 


Don's Photography & 
Cameras 

Cameras— Darkroom Supplies 
Photo Finishing 


4990 Federal Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 


401 8 Tennyson Street 
Denver 12, Colorado 


All Regis Shops 
at 


1 


KINNEY'S SHOES 


JOHN J. r^ 


Collegiate Types in all Colors & Styles 
| From $6.99-15.99 


y RGER COMPANY 

Church Goods ' Religious Articles 


Alameda Shopping Center 

University Hills 

Lakeside Shopping Center 

9690 W. Colfax 
4900 S. Broadway 
7001 N. Federal 




4436 W. 29th Ave., Denver 12, Colo. 
• SR. 7-7961 

Never A Parking Problem 



239 



CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS 



Compliments 



RED OWL STORES, 
INCORPORATED 

DENVER, COLORADO 



240 



Compliments 
of 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK Jr. 

GRACE M. McCORMICK 



c^tuiauons BILLY'S INN 

44th at Lowell Blvd. 

Beer By The Pitcher Or Glass — Party Facilities 
Chinese Food 




COLORADO 
RENT-A-CAR 



Colorado's Finest Cars 
-Plus Services - 



Special Insurance Arrangement 
For Students 



1809 Broadway 



KEystone 4-6186 



siui r 




WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

2—Baibeis—2 

Best Service Before 3 P.M. 

ALL STYLES 

Shines on Saturdays 

HOURS 

8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

Tuesday Through Saturday 

5032 Federal Blvd. 



OLYMPIA Typewriters 



Portables 
Standards 
Electrics 



STAHL TYPEWRITER CO. 




926 17th Street 



MAin 3-1024 



SERVICE GALORE 
at 

REGIS GULF 



5001 Lowell Blvd. 



GL. 5-9988 



241 



Compliments 
of 

The Shirley-Savoy Hotel 



SWIGERT BROS. 
Opt. 

Devoted to Your Complete Visual Welfare 



KE. 4-5819 
1550 California 




SAVE TIME LAUNDRYETTE 

Student Rates 

Clothes washed, fluff dryed 

and folded 

Dry Cleaning — Shirt Finishing 

4224 Tennyson 
Gr. 7-0631 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HEIL 

PACKING 

COMPANY 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 




242 



p gpww rv | 




@&*HJtluHeKt4, &l 




DENVER CHICAGO TRUCKING CO., INC. 
the ONLY direct coast-to-coast carrier 

East 45th at Jackson 
General Offices: Denver, Colorado 

Phone DUdley 8-4567 



243 




Compliments 
OF 

STATE CLEANERS 



Use 
Wallace Products 



Having a party? 



Costume rental for all purposes 

AMERICAN COSTUME CO. 



Cooper Bldg. 
17th and Curtis 
Room 417 



CH. 4-5182 
Denver, Colo 



GOLDEN EARTH 

HOLY COW 
riANDEE PEAT 

M.F X. 
MAGNITE 

RAINBOW M INERAL 
WALLACE FLORAL MIX 
WALLACE MINERAL 
FEED SUPPLEMENT 
ATLAS FISH EMULSION 

WAM 



Waiiajce, fnochuLct* 

WALLACE MINERAL CORPORATION 



Manufacturer and Distributor 



170 WEST VIRGINIA AVENUE 

DENVER 23. COLORADO 

PEARL 3-6612 




GOOD LUCK 
REGIS MEN 



Remember for the finest in 
food and drink; where 
Regis men Meet. 



Banquet room available 
to Regis Men. 



ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 



Vz block off Federal on 44th 



244 




THE DENVER THEATER 



In the heart of 
downtown Denver 




CLARENCE CROSS 
CHARLES J. NAU 
COMPANY, INC. 



CROSS AND NAU 

Company 

221 NORTH LASALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS ANDOVER 3-1425 



GENERAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE 
AND MASONRY REPAIRS 



WATERPROOFING 



TUCK POINTING * CORNICE REMOVAL 



BUILDING CLEANING 



245 



A*td only the- beAt 

For the "REGIS RANGERS" 



ORIENTAL 
THEATRE 

FEDERAL 
THEATRE 

HOLIDAY 
THEATRE 

WESTWOOD 
THEATRE 

GOLDEN 
THEATRE 

GOTHIC 
THEATRE 

RITZ 
THEATRE 

SANTA FE 
THEATRE 

VICTORY 
THEATRE 



44th & TENNYSON 
PH GR. 7-0171 



38th & FEDERAL 
PH GL. 5-5148 



32nd & CLAY 
PH GL. 5-6843 



3333 W. ALAMEDA 
PH WE. 5-3606 



GOLDEN, COLO. 
PH CB. 9-3444 



ENGLEWOOD 
PH SU. 1-5515 



1912 SO. BDWY. 
PH PE. 3-0134 



10th & SANTA FE 
PH TA. 5-5586 



16th & CURTIS 
PH CH. 4-1557 



6n/f 1U fce&t 
9n Motion Pictute ZateAtaUuHesit! 



246 



SEE YOUR 

FIRST CLASS DEALER 

for 

* 1961 CHEVROLETS AND CORVAIRS 

* "OK" USED CARS 

Second Lot at 
2440 So. Broadway 



* SERVICE 



9 special departments 



MURPHY-MAHONEY 



CHEVROLET 

N. SPEER and FEDERAL 
GEnessee 3-6241 




ROLAND M. JOHNSON 
CO. 



Architects 




HOWDY'S 



Just across the street 



Make a Date Tonight at 

"Uncle Mali's" 

WORLD FAMOUS 
TIMBER TAVERN 

(tell your friends) 
2350 Arapahoe 
HI. 2-220 




S E I F E RT 

PONTIAC • CADILLAC 'TEMPEST 




XSa.st> Colfax 

Paul SeifeH, President 

3 Locations to Serve You 
6300 E.Colfax DU. 8-4881 

6201 E. Colfax Used Cars 

5685 So. Bdwy. Littleton 



247 




Compliments 

of 



Foley Tractor Co 



Wichita Kansas 



248 




Compliments of 



PARK TEXACO 



49TH AND LOWELL BLVD. 

Discount with our sticker 



GL. 5-9937 



Keep your nose clean at Regis; 
Keep your clothes clean at 



LOWELL WASH AND DRY 



char-broiler 
steak house 

steak dinner — complete $1.19 
spaghetti dinner — complete $.98 

1520 Broadway 
Al 5-5915 



Compliments 

of 
MURRAY W. SP1NDLER 

Class of '37 



Down's Supply Company 

Wholesale Distributors 
Floor and Wall Coverings 

Phone TAbor 5-6346 2034 Market Street 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



249 







Come Around To The Central 

Saving is easy and convenient at Denver's friendliest 
bank! Central is easiest by far to reach by car, just 
minutes from the Valley Highway. Ten drive-in 
windows to give you immediate service, open 7 AM 
to 7 PM Monday through Friday. Or save by mail 
with convenient stamped envelopes provided by the 
Central. Save the easy convenient way at the Central, 
15th and Arapahoe. 



/ 



ME O 



NTRA 



AHK AND ~TF* 



TOO 



Central Park ... 1 5th & Arapahoe . . . Denver 1 7, Colo. 
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION • FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



DICKS WHOLESALE, INC. 



TOBACCO, CANDIES AND NOVELTIES 



R. A. OSTBERG-PRES. 



SUnset 9-1136 



2842 So. Broadway 



Englewood, Colorado 



250 




"SACRED HEART 



9f 



This page made possible through the courtesy of 

WILFRED G. EYRE 



251 



Best Wishes 

Always? All Ways 

SHANER'S RESTAURANT 

610 17th Street 
DENVER 



murray 






hEfwkinson 



CHerry 4-3377 BROWN PALACE HOTEL • 1701 TREMONT PLACE • DENVER 2. COLO. 



For all your travel needs contact 

Betty Murray— Joan Hawkinson 
Chas. Gcrsbach, Jr. 



E. G. LOWRY 
COMPANY 



General Contractors • Builders 



5933 Kansas 



HOUSTON 7, TEXAS 




"Where Hilton Hospitality 

and western friendliness 
join hands to welcome you" 

FINE FOOD AND BEVERAGES 

COMPLETE FACILITIES FOR 
MEETINGS AND CONVENTIONS 

CONVENIENT LOCATION 

ROOMS: $8.50 & up 

1550 Court Place 

Denver 2, Colo. 

AMherst 6-3911 



COLORADO TRANSPORTATION 

COMPANY 

1 805 Broadway 

Tabor 5-8201 

CHARTER BUSES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



Best Wishes to the Seniors 

Compliments of the 

SOPHOMORES 




r/ l& 



le/imfr 




252 



GROWING WITH DENVER . . . 



*j$ 



1 



1 1 1 1 1 ' I 

* ■ ■ 1 1 J 



I i 1 1 1 



■ 1 1 2 



*.* ■ i i 1 1 i 1 1 1 f • M'f Is r r 



P H I i | | I .] j s 



* f 

' i 

1 1 



ii ? i i j j J '■ ■ 




Bankers Union Life's new Home office Building 
in Denver's Cherry Creek Business Center. 



Now in our 31st year 

Capital and Surplus 

over $2,875,000 

Over $116 in Assets 

to every $100 in Liabilities 

Over $66,000,000 Insurance in force 



SELECT TERRITORY 

California— Colorado— Idaho 

Kansas— Nebraska— Nevada 

New Mexico— North Dakota— Oregon 

South Dakota— Texas 

Washington— Wyoming 



An Old-Line, Legal-Reserve Company — 
writing both participating and 
non-participating plans 



Top first year and vested renewal Commissions 
available for qualified Agents and General Agents 



We salute another great Denver Institution — Regis College! 

Graduates are invited to talk with us on splendid opportunities 
with our organization. 

BANKERS UNION LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

C. B. McCORMICK, PRESIDENT 
Denver Colorado 



253 



SAM'S 



COWHIDE CORNER 



For an evening of fun and enjoyment 



HONOUR'S 
ALL MAKES TYPEWRITER CO. 



OLYMPIA 
ROYAL 
REMINGTON 
UNDERWOOD 




FINE TYPEWRITERS SINCE 1931 
1749 CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 



LAZY C MOTOR LODGE 



MR. AND MRS. GEO. DOOHER 
Operating Owners 



8787 E. Colfax 



De. 3-4201 



reliable/ 




% 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



POTTER'S 
DRUG STORE 

BOULDER'S PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

Phone Hi. 3-1050 
1207 Pearl Street 
Boulder, Colorado 



PAT AIELLO 

Frozen Food To Go 



BIRCH TOLVE 

GL-5-77Q2 



JIM'S PIZZERIA 

"KING OF PIZZA PIE" 
4748 Tejen St. Denver, Colo. 

Italian Spaghetti — Home Made Ravioli-lasagna 
Phone Orders to Go 

Open Daily 4 pnn till 2 am (Sunday 4 till 2) 

Closed Mondays 

You've Tried the Rest, Now Try the Best 



DENVER'S FINEST JEWELER 
FOR OVER 35 YEARS 

• DIAMONDS IN ANY PRICE RANGE 

• WATCHES MADE RY LEADING 
WATCHMAKERS OF THE WORLD 

• GIFTS FOR ALL SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



Same Management, Same Location 
For 35 Years 




254 




ALMA PISTON COMPANY 

CONTRACT MANUFACTURERS • AUTOMOTIVE PARTS A ASSEMBLIES 

2000 EAST MICHIGAN AVENUE, ALMA, MICHIGAN 



GENUINE PARTS DISTRIBUTOR 



Authorized Ford Parts Rebuilder 




Branch Offices-. 

Salt Lake City 

Los Angeles 

San Francisco 



255 



££ 



THE LINDBERG LINE 



95 



Plastic Hobby Kit 

MANUFACTURERS TO THE WORLD 

Skokie, Illinois 




Tulagi 



Boulder 



256 



U.S. Government Inspected Meats Establishment No. 1007 

H. MAPELLI & SONS, INC. 

Wholesale Meat Company 

TAbor 5-5311 

"FAMOUS FOR FINE MEATS FOR OVER 

50 YEARS" 

Roland L. 'Sonny" Mapelli 
Eugene M. "Gene' Mapelli 

Established 1906 

P.O. Box 5103, Terminal Annex 
Denver 1 7, Colorado 


MAMMA ROSA'S PIZZERIA 

PIZZA-BEST OF HOME MADE SPAGHETTI 
RAVIOLA-LASAGNIA 

1 044 South Federal 

WE. 6-2336 


WE. 4-4071 
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA PARISH 
CREDIT UNION 

3801 WEST OHIO AVE. 
DENVER 19, COLORADO 

HOURS: 10 AM TO 6 PM 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


LABATE'S 
Club Lounge 

2840 West 72nd Ave. 
Westminister, Colo. 


EMpire 6-2001 

Chris Maurer's 

TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT 
and FIRESIDE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DINNER DANCES 

12100 East Colfax Denver 8, Colo. 



257 



Pal 

Mr. & Mrs. C. E. Adamson 


Dearborn, Michigan 


Mr. A. L. Alfieri 


Dallas, Texas 


Mr. George T. Ashen 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. S. Austin 


Rockford, Illinois 


Dr. & Mrs. F. M. Bannon 


Stamford, Connecticut 


Mr. & Mrs. P. J. Beauvais 


Pueblo, Colorado 


Mr. James T. Bolan 


Burlington, Iowa 


Mr. & Mrs. F. P. Boyer 


Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 


Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Brennan 


Minneapolis, Minnesota 


Mrs. Harvey F. Brown 


Detroit, Michigan 


Mrs. William Brown 


Chicago, Illinois 


Francis J. Budinger 


Springfield, Illinois 


Mrs. W. R. Butcher 


Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 


Mr. James Clark 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Virgil S. Chandler 


Kansas City, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Collins 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. Paul C. Conrad 


Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan 


Mr. Joe Colquitt 


Westminster, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael T. Crowley 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. Ervin Dahlke 


Grand Island, Nebraska 


Mr. & Mrs. Paul Dalpes 


Phoenix, Arizona 


Mr. John A. Desmond 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank Dieveney 


St. Paul, Minnesota 


Mr. & Mrs. John Distel 


Silverton, Colorado 


Mr. J. P. Dixon 


Casper, Wyoming 


Mr. R. J. Dolebal 


Carroll, Iowa 


Mr. & Mrs. George F. Downey 


Edgewood, Iowa 


Mr. Robert F. Doyle 


Rockford, Illinois 


Mr. J. Francis Driscoll Jr. 


Flossmoor, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Mike Dursey 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. H. D. Eaton 


New Orleans, Louisiana 


Mr. & Mrs. Charles Edwards 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mrs. Wilfred G. Eyre 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. E. J. Feulner 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Logan T. Figliolino 


San Mateo, California 


Mr. T. P. Flahive 


Dallas, Texas 


AAr. George Fouset 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Ray J. Gaffney 


Rockford, Illinois 


Mr. E. T. Gallipeau 


Kirkwood, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. H. B. Graefe 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Mr. Edwin R. Hackett 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Albert Hanebrink 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. Paul Hauptman 


Lakewood, Colorado 


AAr. & Mrs. J. B. Hellman 


Kearney, Nebraska 



258 



'PafatwA 



Mr. James O. Hix 

Mrs. Haskell Hobbs 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Hoogerwere 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Hopkins 

Mr. & Mrs. Max Hummel 

Mr. & Mrs. Felix Kaczynski 

Mr. Robert Kortz 

Mr. & Mrs. Kosednar 

Mr. & Mrs. George Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. R. P. Lamy 

Mrs. Mary K. Leone 

Mr. & Mrs. Mac Donald 

Mr. William C. MacDonald 

hkr. Ralph Maesta 

Mr. Edward Mahaffey 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul A. Maley 

Mr. Bernard A. Mantey 

Mr. D. A. Mantey 

Mr. E. L. Maradei 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel R. Marotts 

Mrs. Gertrude Mattson 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester Maxfield 

Dr. & Mrs. John H. Mayer 

Mr. A. A. Mc Cue 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Mc Cullough 

Marjorie Mc Laughlin 

Mr. D. J. Mc Namara 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Mc Nealy 

Governor Steve Mc Nichols 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank H. Messenger 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund Milner 

Mrs. Louis W. Moorhead 

Mrs. C. P. Moul 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul L. Mullaney 

Mr. Edward G. Mura 

Dr. & Mrs. John Murphy 

Mr. Charles Nocena 

Mr. & Mrs. John O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene T. O'Connor 

Dr. & Mrs. Dayton O'Donnell 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas O'Leary 

Mrs. Gordon O'Neil 



Denver, Colorado 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Moline, Illinois 
Chicago, Illinois 
Denver, Colorado 
Chicago, Illinois 
Denver, Colorado 
West Allis, Wisconsin 
Chicago, Illinois 
Wimmetka, Illinois 
Trinidad, Colorado 
Silver Spring, Maryland 
Chicago, Illinois 
Antonito, Colorado 
Tarentum, Pennsylvania 
Alton, Illinois 
Denver, Colorado 
Denver, Colorado 
Riverside, Illinois 
Northbrook, Illinois 
St. Paul, Minnesota 
Torrington, Wyoming 
Kansas City, Missouri 
St. Paul, Minnesota 
Denver, Colorado 
Denver, Colorado 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Chicago, Illinois 
Denver, Colorado 
Denver, Colorado 
Slinger, Wisconsin 
Wilmette, Illinois 
Kimball, Nebraska 
Wimmetka, Illinois 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Grosse Pointe, Michigan 
Denver, Colorado 
Chicago, Illinois 
Denver, Colorado 
Detroit, Michigan 
Davenport, Iowa 
Green Grove, Illinois 



259 



7><lt 

Mr. Francis L. Parr 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. J. E. Redmond 


Omaha, Nebraska 


Mrs. Clarence Reiken 


Dyersville, Iowa ; 


Mr. & Mrs. C. K. Riff 


Detroit, Michigan 


Mr. Fred T. Rogers 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


Mr. & Mrs. Carl J. Schaffer 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mrs. Herbert E. Schmitz 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. J. R. Schomer 


Denver, Colorado 


Dr. & Mrs. George C. Schulte 


Kenosha, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Joe Sciortino 


Pueblo, Colorado ■ 


Mr. & Mrs. John S. Scott 


Littleton, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. F. E. Shaver 


Flossmoor, Illinois 


Mrs. Robert F. Sheahan 


Memphis, Tennessee 


Dr. & Mrs. E. V. Smith 


Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. William J. Smith 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. W. A. Snow 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. E. A. Splear 


Denver, Colorado 


Dr. Robert H. Sprigg 


Denver, Colorado 


Mrs. S. H. Stein 


Wichita, Kansas 


Mr. & Mrs. E. O. Stone 


Peoria, Illinois 1 



Mr. & Mrs. Jack Sullivan 

Mr. Joseph Tarabino 

Mr. Robert Taylor 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry M. Theisen 

Mr. & Mrs. V. O. Tigge 

Dr. & Mrs. Santo Torcivia 

Mr. Toth 

Mr. & Mrs. C. L. Towns 

Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Trecker 

Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Tressell 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Turley 

Mr. & Mrs. Gene L. Vescovo 

tAr. C. R. Walgreen Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John D. Wallner 

Mr. James Waters 

Mr. James Werner 

Mr. George Wherley 

Mr. & Mrs. George W. Wilson 

Mr. & Mrs. Gordon W. Winks 

Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Yax 

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Zweifel 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Zarlengo 



Medicine Bow, Wyoming 
Trinidad, Colorado 
Wilmette, Illinois 
Sugar Grove, Illinois 
Davenport, Iowa 
Milwaukee, Wistonsin 
Denver, Colorado 
Lincolnwood, Illinois 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 
Galesburg, Illinois 
Menasha, Wisconsin 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Chicago, Illinois 
Galesburg, Illinois 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Cologne, Minnesota 
Creve Coeur, Missouri 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
Denver, Colorado 
Denver, Colorado 



260 






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